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Effect of static wrist position on grip strength.

Bhardwaj P, Nayak SS, Kiswar AM, Sabapathy SR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study.For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion.Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic, Hand, Burns and Reconstructive Microsurgery, Ganga Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Grip strength after wrist arthrodesis is reported to be significantly less than normal. One of the reasons suggested for this decrease in grip strength is that the arthrodesis was performed in a suboptimal position. However, there is no consensus on the ideal position of wrist fusion. There is a paucity of studies evaluating the effect of various fixed positions of the wrist on grip strength and therefore, there is no guide regarding the ideal position of wrist fusion. The authors' aim was to determine the grip strength in various fixed positions of the wrist and subsequently to find out in which position of wrist fusion the grip strength would be maximal.

Materials and methods: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study. For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion. The grip strength in all the participants was measured bilaterally, first without a splint and then with each splint sequentially.

Results: The average grip strength without the splint was 34.3 kg for right and 32.3 kg for the left hand. Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted. The maximum average grip strength with a splint on was recorded at 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg for right and 26.3 kg for left side). There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The grip strength was significantly less in flexed position of the wrist (P < 0.001).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

All measurements were taken in standardized position – standing with the arm held flush to the side of body, elbow flexed to 90 degrees, forearm in mid-prone position and wrist in the position determined by the splint
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Figure 2: All measurements were taken in standardized position – standing with the arm held flush to the side of body, elbow flexed to 90 degrees, forearm in mid-prone position and wrist in the position determined by the splint

Mentions: Hundred normal healthy adult volunteers working in our hospital participated in the study. The age of the participants ranged from 19 to 56 years (average 29 years). There were 60 males and 40 females. Ninety two of 100 were right-hand dominant and eight were left-hand dominant. For the purpose of this study we designed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions of the wrist – 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral wrist position (0 degree wrist extension) and 30 degrees of wrist flexion [Figure 1]. The splints were made with thermoplastic material and an aluminium strip was incorporated over the dorsal aspect to prevent any deformation of the splint and change of wrist position while power gripping. The splint was contoured to attach to the dorsal aspect of the wrist and forearm in order to avoid interference with gripping. It was secured to the limb with one strap in the palm, one just proximal to the wrist and another in the proximal third of the forearm [Figure 2]. The strap in the palm was pliable and thin to minimize interference with grip and allow free rotation of the metacarpals. None of the patients felt the splint was uncomfortable for gripping, or painful.


Effect of static wrist position on grip strength.

Bhardwaj P, Nayak SS, Kiswar AM, Sabapathy SR - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

All measurements were taken in standardized position – standing with the arm held flush to the side of body, elbow flexed to 90 degrees, forearm in mid-prone position and wrist in the position determined by the splint
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111126&req=5

Figure 2: All measurements were taken in standardized position – standing with the arm held flush to the side of body, elbow flexed to 90 degrees, forearm in mid-prone position and wrist in the position determined by the splint
Mentions: Hundred normal healthy adult volunteers working in our hospital participated in the study. The age of the participants ranged from 19 to 56 years (average 29 years). There were 60 males and 40 females. Ninety two of 100 were right-hand dominant and eight were left-hand dominant. For the purpose of this study we designed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions of the wrist – 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral wrist position (0 degree wrist extension) and 30 degrees of wrist flexion [Figure 1]. The splints were made with thermoplastic material and an aluminium strip was incorporated over the dorsal aspect to prevent any deformation of the splint and change of wrist position while power gripping. The splint was contoured to attach to the dorsal aspect of the wrist and forearm in order to avoid interference with gripping. It was secured to the limb with one strap in the palm, one just proximal to the wrist and another in the proximal third of the forearm [Figure 2]. The strap in the palm was pliable and thin to minimize interference with grip and allow free rotation of the metacarpals. None of the patients felt the splint was uncomfortable for gripping, or painful.

Bottom Line: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study.For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion.Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic, Hand, Burns and Reconstructive Microsurgery, Ganga Hospital, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Grip strength after wrist arthrodesis is reported to be significantly less than normal. One of the reasons suggested for this decrease in grip strength is that the arthrodesis was performed in a suboptimal position. However, there is no consensus on the ideal position of wrist fusion. There is a paucity of studies evaluating the effect of various fixed positions of the wrist on grip strength and therefore, there is no guide regarding the ideal position of wrist fusion. The authors' aim was to determine the grip strength in various fixed positions of the wrist and subsequently to find out in which position of wrist fusion the grip strength would be maximal.

Materials and methods: One hundred healthy adults participated in the study. For the purpose of this study, the authors constructed splints to hold the wrist in five different fixed positions: 45, 30 and 15 degrees of wrist extension, neutral and 30 degrees of wrist flexion. The grip strength in all the participants was measured bilaterally, first without a splint and then with each splint sequentially.

Results: The average grip strength without the splint was 34.3 kg for right and 32.3 kg for the left hand. Grip strength decreased by 19-25% when the wrist was splinted. The maximum average grip strength with a splint on was recorded at 45 degrees of extension (27.9 kg for right and 26.3 kg for left side). There was a gradual increase in the grip strength with increase in wrist extension but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The grip strength was significantly less in flexed position of the wrist (P < 0.001).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus