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Body contouring following massive weight loss.

Langer V, Singh A, Aly AS, Cram AE - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body.These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon.As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Plastic Surgery, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Obesity is a global disease with epidemic proportions. Bariatric surgery or modified lifestyles go a long way in mitigating the vast weight gain. Patients following these interventions usually undergo massive weight loss. This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body. Loose skin causes increased morbidity and psychological trauma. This demands various body contouring procedures that are usually excisional. These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon. As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The same patient as in Figure 5 following brachioplasty with improvement in contour. The infrascapular scars bilaterally are those of concomitant back-roll excisions
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Figure 6: The same patient as in Figure 5 following brachioplasty with improvement in contour. The infrascapular scars bilaterally are those of concomitant back-roll excisions

Mentions: Upper arm excess in an MWL patient is a frequent source of dissatisfaction and embarrassment. The “bat wings” of hanging tissue, both vertical and horizontal excess, get caught in clothing and may cause rashes. Consequently, these patients avoid short-sleeved clothing. The traditional T-shaped brachioplasty pattern is the most frequently chosen option for brachioplasty. However, most MWL patients present with significant excess of the upper arms that is contiguous with lateral chest wall excess. This type of deformity will not be adequately eliminated with the T-type approach. Examination reveals that the excess tissue is actually in line with the posterior axillary fold and this excess crosses into the axilla.[6] It follows, therefore, that the excision of the excess skin-fat envelope should be centered along the posterior axillary fold and it extends into the axilla as well as onto the lateral chest wall, helping in incorporation of the upper body lift incisions if required [Figures 5 and 6]. Like in the medial thigh lift, the excision is marked using a two-ellipse technique with the outer ellipse based on the patient's presenting anatomy and the inner ellipse being an adjustment to allow for safe closure.[7]


Body contouring following massive weight loss.

Langer V, Singh A, Aly AS, Cram AE - Indian J Plast Surg (2011)

The same patient as in Figure 5 following brachioplasty with improvement in contour. The infrascapular scars bilaterally are those of concomitant back-roll excisions
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3111107&req=5

Figure 6: The same patient as in Figure 5 following brachioplasty with improvement in contour. The infrascapular scars bilaterally are those of concomitant back-roll excisions
Mentions: Upper arm excess in an MWL patient is a frequent source of dissatisfaction and embarrassment. The “bat wings” of hanging tissue, both vertical and horizontal excess, get caught in clothing and may cause rashes. Consequently, these patients avoid short-sleeved clothing. The traditional T-shaped brachioplasty pattern is the most frequently chosen option for brachioplasty. However, most MWL patients present with significant excess of the upper arms that is contiguous with lateral chest wall excess. This type of deformity will not be adequately eliminated with the T-type approach. Examination reveals that the excess tissue is actually in line with the posterior axillary fold and this excess crosses into the axilla.[6] It follows, therefore, that the excision of the excess skin-fat envelope should be centered along the posterior axillary fold and it extends into the axilla as well as onto the lateral chest wall, helping in incorporation of the upper body lift incisions if required [Figures 5 and 6]. Like in the medial thigh lift, the excision is marked using a two-ellipse technique with the outer ellipse based on the patient's presenting anatomy and the inner ellipse being an adjustment to allow for safe closure.[7]

Bottom Line: This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body.These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon.As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Plastic Surgery, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Obesity is a global disease with epidemic proportions. Bariatric surgery or modified lifestyles go a long way in mitigating the vast weight gain. Patients following these interventions usually undergo massive weight loss. This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body. Loose skin causes increased morbidity and psychological trauma. This demands various body contouring procedures that are usually excisional. These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon. As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus