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Behavioral assessment of emotion discrimination, emotion regulation, and cognitive control in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

Tottenham N, Hare TA, Casey BJ - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: The current study tested 100 children, adolescents, and adults on an Emotional Go/Nogo task, illustrating the ability of this paradigm to identify the unique developmental patterns for each of these three processes in the context of both positive (happy) and negative emotions (fear, sad, and anger), across three different age groups.The findings suggest that emotion regulation is constructed from basic cognition control and emotion discrimination skills.The patterns of behavior from the Emotional Go/Nogo task provide normative benchmark data across a wide range of emotions that can be used for future behavioral and neuroimaging studies that examine the developmental construction of emotion regulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Developmental Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Emotion discrimination, emotion regulation, and cognitive control are three related, yet separable processes that emerge over the course of development. The current study tested 100 children, adolescents, and adults on an Emotional Go/Nogo task, illustrating the ability of this paradigm to identify the unique developmental patterns for each of these three processes in the context of both positive (happy) and negative emotions (fear, sad, and anger), across three different age groups. Consistent with previous literature, our findings show that emotion discrimination and regulatory abilities (both cognitive control and emotion regulation) improve steadily for each age group, with each age group showing unique patterns of performance. The findings suggest that emotion regulation is constructed from basic cognition control and emotion discrimination skills. The patterns of behavior from the Emotional Go/Nogo task provide normative benchmark data across a wide range of emotions that can be used for future behavioral and neuroimaging studies that examine the developmental construction of emotion regulatory processes.

No MeSH data available.


Cognitive control versus emotion regulation. (A) Cognitive control showed a steady improvement in performance for each age group, as indexed by decreasing false alarm rate. (B) Relative to cognitive control, emotion regulation, defined by false alarms to emotional “nogo” stimuli, was more impaired for all subjects, and the discrepancy between cognitive control and emotion regulation diminished with increasing age group.
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Figure 3: Cognitive control versus emotion regulation. (A) Cognitive control showed a steady improvement in performance for each age group, as indexed by decreasing false alarm rate. (B) Relative to cognitive control, emotion regulation, defined by false alarms to emotional “nogo” stimuli, was more impaired for all subjects, and the discrepancy between cognitive control and emotion regulation diminished with increasing age group.

Mentions: A repeated measures ANOVA with between subjects factors of age group (children, adolescents, adults) and gender (male, female) and within subjects factors of emotion (happy, fear, angry, sad) and stimulus type (emotion as “go” or “nogo”) was performed on the dependent measure of false alarm rate. As shown in Figure 3, there were two-way interactions of age by stimulus type [F(2,94) = 5.88, p < 0.04, ] and emotion by stimulus type [F(3,282) = 3.67, p < 0.015, ], and there were main effects of age [F(2,94) = 40.29, p < 10−13, ], emotion [F(3,282) = 31.21, p < 10−17, ], and stimulus type [F(1,94) = 34.18, p < 10−8, ].


Behavioral assessment of emotion discrimination, emotion regulation, and cognitive control in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

Tottenham N, Hare TA, Casey BJ - Front Psychol (2011)

Cognitive control versus emotion regulation. (A) Cognitive control showed a steady improvement in performance for each age group, as indexed by decreasing false alarm rate. (B) Relative to cognitive control, emotion regulation, defined by false alarms to emotional “nogo” stimuli, was more impaired for all subjects, and the discrepancy between cognitive control and emotion regulation diminished with increasing age group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3110936&req=5

Figure 3: Cognitive control versus emotion regulation. (A) Cognitive control showed a steady improvement in performance for each age group, as indexed by decreasing false alarm rate. (B) Relative to cognitive control, emotion regulation, defined by false alarms to emotional “nogo” stimuli, was more impaired for all subjects, and the discrepancy between cognitive control and emotion regulation diminished with increasing age group.
Mentions: A repeated measures ANOVA with between subjects factors of age group (children, adolescents, adults) and gender (male, female) and within subjects factors of emotion (happy, fear, angry, sad) and stimulus type (emotion as “go” or “nogo”) was performed on the dependent measure of false alarm rate. As shown in Figure 3, there were two-way interactions of age by stimulus type [F(2,94) = 5.88, p < 0.04, ] and emotion by stimulus type [F(3,282) = 3.67, p < 0.015, ], and there were main effects of age [F(2,94) = 40.29, p < 10−13, ], emotion [F(3,282) = 31.21, p < 10−17, ], and stimulus type [F(1,94) = 34.18, p < 10−8, ].

Bottom Line: The current study tested 100 children, adolescents, and adults on an Emotional Go/Nogo task, illustrating the ability of this paradigm to identify the unique developmental patterns for each of these three processes in the context of both positive (happy) and negative emotions (fear, sad, and anger), across three different age groups.The findings suggest that emotion regulation is constructed from basic cognition control and emotion discrimination skills.The patterns of behavior from the Emotional Go/Nogo task provide normative benchmark data across a wide range of emotions that can be used for future behavioral and neuroimaging studies that examine the developmental construction of emotion regulatory processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Developmental Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Emotion discrimination, emotion regulation, and cognitive control are three related, yet separable processes that emerge over the course of development. The current study tested 100 children, adolescents, and adults on an Emotional Go/Nogo task, illustrating the ability of this paradigm to identify the unique developmental patterns for each of these three processes in the context of both positive (happy) and negative emotions (fear, sad, and anger), across three different age groups. Consistent with previous literature, our findings show that emotion discrimination and regulatory abilities (both cognitive control and emotion regulation) improve steadily for each age group, with each age group showing unique patterns of performance. The findings suggest that emotion regulation is constructed from basic cognition control and emotion discrimination skills. The patterns of behavior from the Emotional Go/Nogo task provide normative benchmark data across a wide range of emotions that can be used for future behavioral and neuroimaging studies that examine the developmental construction of emotion regulatory processes.

No MeSH data available.