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Doppler angle correction in the measurement of intrarenal parameters.

Gao J, Hentel K, Zhu Q, Ma T, Shih G, Mennitt K, Min R - Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis (2011)

Bottom Line: There were statistical differences in PSV and EDV at the interlobar artery in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidney between Group 1 and Group 2 (all P < 0.001).PSV and EDV in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Group 2.RI in Group 1 was the same as that in Group 2 in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidneys.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, USA;

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess differences in intrarenal artery Doppler parameters measured without and with Doppler angle correction.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed color duplex sonography in 30 normally functioning kidneys (20 native kidneys in 10 subjects and 10 transplanted kidneys in 10 subjects) performed between January 26, 2010 and July 26, 2010. There were 10 age-matched men and 10 age-matched women (mean 39.8 ± 12.2, range 21-60 years) in this study. Depending on whether the Doppler angle was corrected in the spectral Doppler measurement, Doppler parameters including peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index (RI) measured at the interlobar artery of the kidney were divided into two groups, ie, initial Doppler parameters measured without Doppler angle correction (Group 1) and remeasured Doppler parameters with Doppler angle correction (Group 2). Values for PSV, EDV, and RI measured without Doppler angle correction were compared with those measured with Doppler angle correction, and were analyzed statistically with a paired-samples t-test.

Results: There were statistical differences in PSV and EDV at the interlobar artery in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidney between Group 1 and Group 2 (all P < 0.001). PSV and EDV in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Group 2. RI in Group 1 was the same as that in Group 2 in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidneys.

Conclusion: Doppler angle correction plays an important role in the accurate measurement of intrarenal blood flow velocity. The true flow velocity converted from the maximum Doppler velocity shift is produced only when the Doppler angle is 0°, so that the emission sound beam is parallel to the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery. Therefore, the Doppler angle correction should be routinely applied and displayed on renal color duplex sonography.

No MeSH data available.


Same static image as in Figure 1, although a Doppler angle correction of 1° appears on the image (white dotted arrow), and the emission sound beam (white arrow) from the transducer is not parallel to the direction of the blood flow. As result, all values of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, and resistive index are the same as that measured without Doppler angle correction in Figure 1. Therefore, the angle of 1° on the image is not the angle between the emission sound beam and the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery, and instead is the angle between the emission sound beam and the Doppler angle correction.
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f2a-ijnrd-4-049: Same static image as in Figure 1, although a Doppler angle correction of 1° appears on the image (white dotted arrow), and the emission sound beam (white arrow) from the transducer is not parallel to the direction of the blood flow. As result, all values of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, and resistive index are the same as that measured without Doppler angle correction in Figure 1. Therefore, the angle of 1° on the image is not the angle between the emission sound beam and the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery, and instead is the angle between the emission sound beam and the Doppler angle correction.

Mentions: The initial measurements of PSV, EDV, and RI at the upper, mid, and lower poles of the native and transplanted kidneys on the spectra were done without displaying the Doppler angle correction (Figure 1). Images with spectral measurements were reviewed with an ultrasound scanner or the ultrasound reading station of the picture archiving and communications system. When reviewing a static image, Doppler angle correction was displayed and adjusted until the Doppler angle was near 0°, the emission sound beam being parallel to the flow direction of the interlobar artery. The PSV, EDV, and RI were then remeasured and calculated (Figure 2). Finally, all spectral Doppler measurements without and with Doppler angle correction were recorded for statistical analysis.


Doppler angle correction in the measurement of intrarenal parameters.

Gao J, Hentel K, Zhu Q, Ma T, Shih G, Mennitt K, Min R - Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis (2011)

Same static image as in Figure 1, although a Doppler angle correction of 1° appears on the image (white dotted arrow), and the emission sound beam (white arrow) from the transducer is not parallel to the direction of the blood flow. As result, all values of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, and resistive index are the same as that measured without Doppler angle correction in Figure 1. Therefore, the angle of 1° on the image is not the angle between the emission sound beam and the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery, and instead is the angle between the emission sound beam and the Doppler angle correction.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108792&req=5

f2a-ijnrd-4-049: Same static image as in Figure 1, although a Doppler angle correction of 1° appears on the image (white dotted arrow), and the emission sound beam (white arrow) from the transducer is not parallel to the direction of the blood flow. As result, all values of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, and resistive index are the same as that measured without Doppler angle correction in Figure 1. Therefore, the angle of 1° on the image is not the angle between the emission sound beam and the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery, and instead is the angle between the emission sound beam and the Doppler angle correction.
Mentions: The initial measurements of PSV, EDV, and RI at the upper, mid, and lower poles of the native and transplanted kidneys on the spectra were done without displaying the Doppler angle correction (Figure 1). Images with spectral measurements were reviewed with an ultrasound scanner or the ultrasound reading station of the picture archiving and communications system. When reviewing a static image, Doppler angle correction was displayed and adjusted until the Doppler angle was near 0°, the emission sound beam being parallel to the flow direction of the interlobar artery. The PSV, EDV, and RI were then remeasured and calculated (Figure 2). Finally, all spectral Doppler measurements without and with Doppler angle correction were recorded for statistical analysis.

Bottom Line: There were statistical differences in PSV and EDV at the interlobar artery in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidney between Group 1 and Group 2 (all P < 0.001).PSV and EDV in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Group 2.RI in Group 1 was the same as that in Group 2 in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidneys.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, USA;

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess differences in intrarenal artery Doppler parameters measured without and with Doppler angle correction.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed color duplex sonography in 30 normally functioning kidneys (20 native kidneys in 10 subjects and 10 transplanted kidneys in 10 subjects) performed between January 26, 2010 and July 26, 2010. There were 10 age-matched men and 10 age-matched women (mean 39.8 ± 12.2, range 21-60 years) in this study. Depending on whether the Doppler angle was corrected in the spectral Doppler measurement, Doppler parameters including peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index (RI) measured at the interlobar artery of the kidney were divided into two groups, ie, initial Doppler parameters measured without Doppler angle correction (Group 1) and remeasured Doppler parameters with Doppler angle correction (Group 2). Values for PSV, EDV, and RI measured without Doppler angle correction were compared with those measured with Doppler angle correction, and were analyzed statistically with a paired-samples t-test.

Results: There were statistical differences in PSV and EDV at the interlobar artery in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidney between Group 1 and Group 2 (all P < 0.001). PSV and EDV in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Group 2. RI in Group 1 was the same as that in Group 2 in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidneys.

Conclusion: Doppler angle correction plays an important role in the accurate measurement of intrarenal blood flow velocity. The true flow velocity converted from the maximum Doppler velocity shift is produced only when the Doppler angle is 0°, so that the emission sound beam is parallel to the direction of blood flow at the sampled artery. Therefore, the Doppler angle correction should be routinely applied and displayed on renal color duplex sonography.

No MeSH data available.