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Insomnia medication use and the probability of an accidental event in an older adult population.

Avidan AY, Palmer LA, Doan JF, Baran RW - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2010)

Bottom Line: Data were analyzed for 445,329 patients.Patients taking a long-acting benzodiazepine (1.21 odds ratio [OR]), short-acting benzodiazepine (1.16 OR), or nonbenzodiazepine (1.12 OR) had a significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event during the first month following treatment initiation compared with patients taking the reference medication (P < 0.05 for all).Older adults taking an SAD or any of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists appear to have a greater risk of an accidental event compared with a reference group taking an MR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCLA Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA, USA;

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study examined the risk of accidental events in older adults prescribed a sedating antidepressant, long-acting benzodiazepine, short-acting benzodiazepine, and nonbenzodiazepine, relative to a reference group (selective melatonin receptor agonist).

Methods: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of older adults (≥65 years) with newly initiated pharmacological treatment of insomnia. Data were collected from the Thomson MarketScan(®) Medicare Supplemental and Coordination of Benefits databases (January 1, 2000, through June 30, 2006). Probit models were used to evaluate the probability of an accidental event.

Results: Data were analyzed for 445,329 patients. Patients taking a long-acting benzodiazepine (1.21 odds ratio [OR]), short-acting benzodiazepine (1.16 OR), or nonbenzodiazepine (1.12 OR) had a significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event during the first month following treatment initiation compared with patients taking the reference medication (P < 0.05 for all). A significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event was also observed during the 3-month period following the initiation of treatment (1.62 long-acting benzodiazepine, 1.60 short-acting benzodiazepine, 1.48 nonbenzodiazepine, and 1.56 sedating antidepressant; P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Older adults taking an SAD or any of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists appear to have a greater risk of an accidental event compared with a reference group taking an MR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow-chart of the derivation of the sample population.
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f1-dhps-2-225: Flow-chart of the derivation of the sample population.

Mentions: The sample used to estimate the probability of an accidental event consisted of 445,329 Medicare patients. A flow-chart describing the derivation of this sample is shown is Figure 1. Demographic and clinical characteristics are shown in Table 1. The majority of patients were prescribed long-acting benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (36.38% and 35.25%, respectively). The remaining patients were prescribed short-acting benzodiazepines (18.21%), a sedating antidepressant (9.94%), or a selective melatonin receptor agonist (0.22%).


Insomnia medication use and the probability of an accidental event in an older adult population.

Avidan AY, Palmer LA, Doan JF, Baran RW - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2010)

Flow-chart of the derivation of the sample population.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108703&req=5

f1-dhps-2-225: Flow-chart of the derivation of the sample population.
Mentions: The sample used to estimate the probability of an accidental event consisted of 445,329 Medicare patients. A flow-chart describing the derivation of this sample is shown is Figure 1. Demographic and clinical characteristics are shown in Table 1. The majority of patients were prescribed long-acting benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (36.38% and 35.25%, respectively). The remaining patients were prescribed short-acting benzodiazepines (18.21%), a sedating antidepressant (9.94%), or a selective melatonin receptor agonist (0.22%).

Bottom Line: Data were analyzed for 445,329 patients.Patients taking a long-acting benzodiazepine (1.21 odds ratio [OR]), short-acting benzodiazepine (1.16 OR), or nonbenzodiazepine (1.12 OR) had a significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event during the first month following treatment initiation compared with patients taking the reference medication (P < 0.05 for all).Older adults taking an SAD or any of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists appear to have a greater risk of an accidental event compared with a reference group taking an MR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCLA Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA, USA;

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study examined the risk of accidental events in older adults prescribed a sedating antidepressant, long-acting benzodiazepine, short-acting benzodiazepine, and nonbenzodiazepine, relative to a reference group (selective melatonin receptor agonist).

Methods: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of older adults (≥65 years) with newly initiated pharmacological treatment of insomnia. Data were collected from the Thomson MarketScan(®) Medicare Supplemental and Coordination of Benefits databases (January 1, 2000, through June 30, 2006). Probit models were used to evaluate the probability of an accidental event.

Results: Data were analyzed for 445,329 patients. Patients taking a long-acting benzodiazepine (1.21 odds ratio [OR]), short-acting benzodiazepine (1.16 OR), or nonbenzodiazepine (1.12 OR) had a significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event during the first month following treatment initiation compared with patients taking the reference medication (P < 0.05 for all). A significantly higher probability of experiencing an accidental event was also observed during the 3-month period following the initiation of treatment (1.62 long-acting benzodiazepine, 1.60 short-acting benzodiazepine, 1.48 nonbenzodiazepine, and 1.56 sedating antidepressant; P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Older adults taking an SAD or any of the benzodiazepine receptor agonists appear to have a greater risk of an accidental event compared with a reference group taking an MR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus