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Efficacy, tolerability and safety of biologic therapy in rheumatoid disease: patient considerations.

Horton S, Buch MH, Emery P - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2010)

Bottom Line: Disease remission is now an achievable goal in newly diagnosed patients.Since the advent of the first tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor in 1999, other biologics have proved necessary as individuals respond to varying degrees with different therapies.Several are now available for the treatment of patients with RA that remains active despite DMARD treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds.

ABSTRACT
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease in which chronic inflammation leads to joint destruction and extra-articular complications. Early and effective inhibition of inflammation is critical in order to prevent the progressive joint damage that occurs rapidly after onset of the disease. In the past, treatment for this purpose was limited to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which were often suboptimal. Within the last decade however, the development of biologic therapies, targeted against cytokines and cells involved in the inflammatory process, has revolutionized the management of RA. Disease remission is now an achievable goal in newly diagnosed patients. Since the advent of the first tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor in 1999, other biologics have proved necessary as individuals respond to varying degrees with different therapies. Several are now available for the treatment of patients with RA that remains active despite DMARD treatment. This article reviews the evidence, over the last decade, of the efficacy and safety of biologic therapies used in this context, and the recent clinical data supporting the use of biologic therapy earlier in the disease process as first-line therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Targets of current biological therapies for RA.Note: *Developed and assessed in clinical trials, but not yet widely available.Abbreviations: CTLA 4, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4; CD, cluster of differentiation.
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f1-dhps-2-101: Targets of current biological therapies for RA.Note: *Developed and assessed in clinical trials, but not yet widely available.Abbreviations: CTLA 4, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4; CD, cluster of differentiation.

Mentions: For a number of patients however, MTX and other conventional DMARDs are ineffective at achieving suppression of disease activity and preventing permanent joint damage. This need for alternative, superior treatment options has led to the development of biologic therapies, targeted against cells and cytokines known to play a role in the pathogenesis of RA (Figure 1).7 In clinical practice, biologic therapies are licensed for use in patients with moderate to severely active RA who have not responded to DMARDs. This article reviews the evidence supporting their use in these circumstances and the emerging evidence for use outside this remit in patients with early RA who may not have previously received DMARD treatment.


Efficacy, tolerability and safety of biologic therapy in rheumatoid disease: patient considerations.

Horton S, Buch MH, Emery P - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2010)

Targets of current biological therapies for RA.Note: *Developed and assessed in clinical trials, but not yet widely available.Abbreviations: CTLA 4, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4; CD, cluster of differentiation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108701&req=5

f1-dhps-2-101: Targets of current biological therapies for RA.Note: *Developed and assessed in clinical trials, but not yet widely available.Abbreviations: CTLA 4, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4; CD, cluster of differentiation.
Mentions: For a number of patients however, MTX and other conventional DMARDs are ineffective at achieving suppression of disease activity and preventing permanent joint damage. This need for alternative, superior treatment options has led to the development of biologic therapies, targeted against cells and cytokines known to play a role in the pathogenesis of RA (Figure 1).7 In clinical practice, biologic therapies are licensed for use in patients with moderate to severely active RA who have not responded to DMARDs. This article reviews the evidence supporting their use in these circumstances and the emerging evidence for use outside this remit in patients with early RA who may not have previously received DMARD treatment.

Bottom Line: Disease remission is now an achievable goal in newly diagnosed patients.Since the advent of the first tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor in 1999, other biologics have proved necessary as individuals respond to varying degrees with different therapies.Several are now available for the treatment of patients with RA that remains active despite DMARD treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds.

ABSTRACT
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease in which chronic inflammation leads to joint destruction and extra-articular complications. Early and effective inhibition of inflammation is critical in order to prevent the progressive joint damage that occurs rapidly after onset of the disease. In the past, treatment for this purpose was limited to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which were often suboptimal. Within the last decade however, the development of biologic therapies, targeted against cytokines and cells involved in the inflammatory process, has revolutionized the management of RA. Disease remission is now an achievable goal in newly diagnosed patients. Since the advent of the first tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor in 1999, other biologics have proved necessary as individuals respond to varying degrees with different therapies. Several are now available for the treatment of patients with RA that remains active despite DMARD treatment. This article reviews the evidence, over the last decade, of the efficacy and safety of biologic therapies used in this context, and the recent clinical data supporting the use of biologic therapy earlier in the disease process as first-line therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus