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Anti-metallothionein IgG and levels of metallothionein in autistic children with GI disease.

Russo AJ - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2009)

Bottom Line: Nine of 10 (90%) of autistic children with GI disease with high MT levels had a regressive onset (compared to the expected 25 of 41, or 61%, in this group) (p < 0.05), whereas only nine of 13 of the autistic children with GI disease and anti-MT IgG had a regressive onset (70%) which was not significantly higher than the expected.We didn't find any correlation between severity of GI disease and MT concentration or anti-MT IgG.These results suggest a relationship between MT, anti-MT IgG and GI disease seen in many ASD individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mount Saint Mary's University, Emmitsburg, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess both serum concentration of metallotionein (MT) and anti-metallothionein (anti-MT) immunoglobulin G (IgG) in autistic children with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and controls, and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between the presence of MT, anti-MT IgG, and inflammatory GI disease seen in many children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD).

Subjects and methods: ELISAs were used to measure serum MT and anti-MT IgG in 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (many with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia [LNH] and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel, and/or stomach), and 33 controls (17 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease and 16 age-matched children without autism or GI disease).

Results: Ten of 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease had high serum concentration of MT compared to only one of the 33 controls (p < 0.01). Thirteen of the 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease had anti-MT IgG compared to only four of 33 controls (p < 0.01). Nine of 10 (90%) of autistic children with GI disease with high MT levels had a regressive onset (compared to the expected 25 of 41, or 61%, in this group) (p < 0.05), whereas only nine of 13 of the autistic children with GI disease and anti-MT IgG had a regressive onset (70%) which was not significantly higher than the expected. We didn't find any correlation between severity of GI disease and MT concentration or anti-MT IgG.

Discussion: These results suggest a relationship between MT, anti-MT IgG and GI disease seen in many ASD individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ELISA to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal).Abbreviations: ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; MT, metallothionein; OD, oxidation ditch.
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f2-dhps-1-001: ELISA to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal).Abbreviations: ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; MT, metallothionein; OD, oxidation ditch.

Mentions: We used the ELISA described above to measure serum MT and anti-MT IgG levels in 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease and 33 age/gender-matched controls (as described above). All assays were performed in triplicate. Any variation in OD greater than 0.05 was not included in this data. A typical assay measuring anti-MT IgG is shown on Figure 1. An ELISA was performed to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal) (Figure 2).


Anti-metallothionein IgG and levels of metallothionein in autistic children with GI disease.

Russo AJ - Drug Healthc Patient Saf (2009)

ELISA to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal).Abbreviations: ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; MT, metallothionein; OD, oxidation ditch.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108685&req=5

f2-dhps-1-001: ELISA to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal).Abbreviations: ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; MT, metallothionein; OD, oxidation ditch.
Mentions: We used the ELISA described above to measure serum MT and anti-MT IgG levels in 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease and 33 age/gender-matched controls (as described above). All assays were performed in triplicate. Any variation in OD greater than 0.05 was not included in this data. A typical assay measuring anti-MT IgG is shown on Figure 1. An ELISA was performed to establish MT concentration/OD relationship. Normal MT serum concentration is approximately 80–200 mg/dL serum. Above 200 mg/dL (0.75 OD) was considered high (above normal) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Nine of 10 (90%) of autistic children with GI disease with high MT levels had a regressive onset (compared to the expected 25 of 41, or 61%, in this group) (p < 0.05), whereas only nine of 13 of the autistic children with GI disease and anti-MT IgG had a regressive onset (70%) which was not significantly higher than the expected.We didn't find any correlation between severity of GI disease and MT concentration or anti-MT IgG.These results suggest a relationship between MT, anti-MT IgG and GI disease seen in many ASD individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mount Saint Mary's University, Emmitsburg, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess both serum concentration of metallotionein (MT) and anti-metallothionein (anti-MT) immunoglobulin G (IgG) in autistic children with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and controls, and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between the presence of MT, anti-MT IgG, and inflammatory GI disease seen in many children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD).

Subjects and methods: ELISAs were used to measure serum MT and anti-MT IgG in 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (many with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia [LNH] and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel, and/or stomach), and 33 controls (17 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease and 16 age-matched children without autism or GI disease).

Results: Ten of 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease had high serum concentration of MT compared to only one of the 33 controls (p < 0.01). Thirteen of the 41 autistic children with chronic digestive disease had anti-MT IgG compared to only four of 33 controls (p < 0.01). Nine of 10 (90%) of autistic children with GI disease with high MT levels had a regressive onset (compared to the expected 25 of 41, or 61%, in this group) (p < 0.05), whereas only nine of 13 of the autistic children with GI disease and anti-MT IgG had a regressive onset (70%) which was not significantly higher than the expected. We didn't find any correlation between severity of GI disease and MT concentration or anti-MT IgG.

Discussion: These results suggest a relationship between MT, anti-MT IgG and GI disease seen in many ASD individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus