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Comparison of preference and safety of powder and liquid lactulose in adult patients with chronic constipation.

Barish CF, Voss B, Kaelin B - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2010)

Bottom Line: Chronic constipation is an important clinical condition which can result in serious discomfort and even require hospitalization.More patients preferred powder compared with liquid lactulose and the products were equally safe.These findings may impact patient compliance, and therefore may affect clinical outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wake Research Associates, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA;

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic constipation is an important clinical condition which can result in serious discomfort and even require hospitalization. Powder and liquid lactulose are designated as clinically equivalent for the treatment of constipation, but there are significant differences in the taste, consistency, and portability of the products, which may affect patient compliance and therefore clinical outcome.

Aim: To evaluate patient preference between powder and liquid lactulose in terms of overall preference, taste, consistency, and portability, and safety in terms of adverse events.

Methods: Three sites randomized patients (total n = 50) to powder or liquid lactulose for seven days with crossover. Patient preference was assessed by a questionnaire, and the occurrence of adverse events was monitored.

Results: Of those expressing a preference, 44% and 57% more patients preferred the taste and consistency, respectively, of powder over liquid lactulose. More than six times as many patients preferred the portability of powder compared with liquid lactulose and, overall, 77% more patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose. There was no difference between treatment groups in terms of adverse events (P = 0.635).

Conclusions: More patients preferred powder compared with liquid lactulose and the products were equally safe. These findings may impact patient compliance, and therefore may affect clinical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Preference data in terms of overall preference and preference of taste, consistency, and portability in all patients (includes those who expressed ‘no preference’).
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f2-ceg-3-153: Preference data in terms of overall preference and preference of taste, consistency, and portability in all patients (includes those who expressed ‘no preference’).

Mentions: Of the 48 patients for whom preference data were available, no significant difference in terms of overall preference, taste, or consistency between powder and liquid lactulose was found, likely due to the small sample size (Table 2 and Figure 2). However, significantly more patients preferred powder lactulose in terms of portability (P < 0.001, Table 2 and Figure 2). In addition, of those patients expressing a preference, 23/39 (59%) and 22/36 (61%) patients preferred the taste and consistency of powder over liquid lactulose, respectively, and overall 23/36 (64%) patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose (not significant, Table 2 and Figure 3). A comparison of these patient ratios revealed that of those patients expressing a preference, 44% and 57% more patients preferred the taste and consistency of powder over liquid lactulose, respectively, and overall 77% more patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose. In addition, more than six times as many patients whom expressed a preference preferred the portability of powder over liquid lactulose (P < 0.001, Table 2 and Figure 3).


Comparison of preference and safety of powder and liquid lactulose in adult patients with chronic constipation.

Barish CF, Voss B, Kaelin B - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2010)

Preference data in terms of overall preference and preference of taste, consistency, and portability in all patients (includes those who expressed ‘no preference’).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108673&req=5

f2-ceg-3-153: Preference data in terms of overall preference and preference of taste, consistency, and portability in all patients (includes those who expressed ‘no preference’).
Mentions: Of the 48 patients for whom preference data were available, no significant difference in terms of overall preference, taste, or consistency between powder and liquid lactulose was found, likely due to the small sample size (Table 2 and Figure 2). However, significantly more patients preferred powder lactulose in terms of portability (P < 0.001, Table 2 and Figure 2). In addition, of those patients expressing a preference, 23/39 (59%) and 22/36 (61%) patients preferred the taste and consistency of powder over liquid lactulose, respectively, and overall 23/36 (64%) patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose (not significant, Table 2 and Figure 3). A comparison of these patient ratios revealed that of those patients expressing a preference, 44% and 57% more patients preferred the taste and consistency of powder over liquid lactulose, respectively, and overall 77% more patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose. In addition, more than six times as many patients whom expressed a preference preferred the portability of powder over liquid lactulose (P < 0.001, Table 2 and Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Chronic constipation is an important clinical condition which can result in serious discomfort and even require hospitalization.More patients preferred powder compared with liquid lactulose and the products were equally safe.These findings may impact patient compliance, and therefore may affect clinical outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wake Research Associates, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA;

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic constipation is an important clinical condition which can result in serious discomfort and even require hospitalization. Powder and liquid lactulose are designated as clinically equivalent for the treatment of constipation, but there are significant differences in the taste, consistency, and portability of the products, which may affect patient compliance and therefore clinical outcome.

Aim: To evaluate patient preference between powder and liquid lactulose in terms of overall preference, taste, consistency, and portability, and safety in terms of adverse events.

Methods: Three sites randomized patients (total n = 50) to powder or liquid lactulose for seven days with crossover. Patient preference was assessed by a questionnaire, and the occurrence of adverse events was monitored.

Results: Of those expressing a preference, 44% and 57% more patients preferred the taste and consistency, respectively, of powder over liquid lactulose. More than six times as many patients preferred the portability of powder compared with liquid lactulose and, overall, 77% more patients preferred powder over liquid lactulose. There was no difference between treatment groups in terms of adverse events (P = 0.635).

Conclusions: More patients preferred powder compared with liquid lactulose and the products were equally safe. These findings may impact patient compliance, and therefore may affect clinical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus