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Low serum myeloperoxidase in autistic children with gastrointestinal disease.

Russo AJ, Krigsman A, Jepson B, Wakefield A - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2009)

Bottom Line: Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (most with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 48 controls (12 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease, 20 age-matched children without autism or GI disease, and 16 nonautistic individuals with no family history of autism) were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays designed to quantitate serum MPO levels.We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had low serum levels of MPO.These results suggest a relationship between low MPO levels and GI disease seen in a subpopulation of autism spectrum disorders individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Director, Health Research Institute/Pfeiffer Treatment Center, Warrenville, IL, USA;

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess serum myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in autistic children with severe gastrointestinal (GI) disease and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between serum MPO concentration and inflammatory GI disease, including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), previously seen in a subgroup of autistic children.

Subjects and methods: Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (most with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 48 controls (12 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease, 20 age-matched children without autism or GI disease, and 16 nonautistic individuals with no family history of autism) were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays designed to quantitate serum MPO levels. MPO serum concentration of autistic children with GI disease was compared to GI disease severity (including LNH and erythema) and presence of ANCA.

Results: We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had low serum levels of MPO. However, there was no significant relationship between these levels and severity of GI disease, including the presence of ANCA.

Discussion: These results suggest a relationship between low MPO levels and GI disease seen in a subpopulation of autism spectrum disorders individuals. MPO concentration may therefore be a useful biomarker for GI disease in this group of autistic children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MPO serum concentration was established for each individual by testing and correlating to known standards of various concentrations of MPO (15–1.875 ng/ml) as well as a negative control (serum diluent alone).Abbreviation: MPO, myeloperoxidase.
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f2-ceg-2-085: MPO serum concentration was established for each individual by testing and correlating to known standards of various concentrations of MPO (15–1.875 ng/ml) as well as a negative control (serum diluent alone).Abbreviation: MPO, myeloperoxidase.

Mentions: Using the ELISA described above, autistic children with chronic digestive disease were tested for serum MPO levels. Results of a typical assay are shown in Figure 1. In each assay, MPO concentrations were determined by comparing experimental and control serum levels with MPO standards and negative controls (sample diluent alone) (Figure 2). For each assay, there were three or four replicate samples tested in each group (control and experimental), and each assay was repeated at least twice. We found that the MPO concentration of autistic children with GI disease (n = 40; m = 2.45 ng/ml ± 1.62) was significantly lower than three control groups; age/diagnosis-matched autistic children with no GI disease (n = 12; m = 14.35 ± 5.87; p < 0.01); age/diagnosis-matched nonautistic children with no GI disease (n = 20; m = 13.33 ± 5.74; p <0.01) and individuals with no family history of autism (n = 16; m = 10.55 ± 5.71; p < 0.01) (Figure 3).


Low serum myeloperoxidase in autistic children with gastrointestinal disease.

Russo AJ, Krigsman A, Jepson B, Wakefield A - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2009)

MPO serum concentration was established for each individual by testing and correlating to known standards of various concentrations of MPO (15–1.875 ng/ml) as well as a negative control (serum diluent alone).Abbreviation: MPO, myeloperoxidase.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108639&req=5

f2-ceg-2-085: MPO serum concentration was established for each individual by testing and correlating to known standards of various concentrations of MPO (15–1.875 ng/ml) as well as a negative control (serum diluent alone).Abbreviation: MPO, myeloperoxidase.
Mentions: Using the ELISA described above, autistic children with chronic digestive disease were tested for serum MPO levels. Results of a typical assay are shown in Figure 1. In each assay, MPO concentrations were determined by comparing experimental and control serum levels with MPO standards and negative controls (sample diluent alone) (Figure 2). For each assay, there were three or four replicate samples tested in each group (control and experimental), and each assay was repeated at least twice. We found that the MPO concentration of autistic children with GI disease (n = 40; m = 2.45 ng/ml ± 1.62) was significantly lower than three control groups; age/diagnosis-matched autistic children with no GI disease (n = 12; m = 14.35 ± 5.87; p < 0.01); age/diagnosis-matched nonautistic children with no GI disease (n = 20; m = 13.33 ± 5.74; p <0.01) and individuals with no family history of autism (n = 16; m = 10.55 ± 5.71; p < 0.01) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (most with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 48 controls (12 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease, 20 age-matched children without autism or GI disease, and 16 nonautistic individuals with no family history of autism) were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays designed to quantitate serum MPO levels.We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had low serum levels of MPO.These results suggest a relationship between low MPO levels and GI disease seen in a subpopulation of autism spectrum disorders individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Director, Health Research Institute/Pfeiffer Treatment Center, Warrenville, IL, USA;

ABSTRACT

Aim: To assess serum myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in autistic children with severe gastrointestinal (GI) disease and to test the hypothesis that there is an association between serum MPO concentration and inflammatory GI disease, including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), previously seen in a subgroup of autistic children.

Subjects and methods: Serum from 40 autistic children with chronic digestive disease (most with ileo-colonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia (LNH) and inflammation of the colorectum, small bowel and/or stomach), and 48 controls (12 age-matched autistic children with no GI disease, 20 age-matched children without autism or GI disease, and 16 nonautistic individuals with no family history of autism) were tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays designed to quantitate serum MPO levels. MPO serum concentration of autistic children with GI disease was compared to GI disease severity (including LNH and erythema) and presence of ANCA.

Results: We found that a significant number of autistic children with chronic digestive disease had low serum levels of MPO. However, there was no significant relationship between these levels and severity of GI disease, including the presence of ANCA.

Discussion: These results suggest a relationship between low MPO levels and GI disease seen in a subpopulation of autism spectrum disorders individuals. MPO concentration may therefore be a useful biomarker for GI disease in this group of autistic children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus