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Outcome for esophageal cancer following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy but not esophagectomy: Nonsurgical treatment of esophageal cancer.

Zingg U, Divalentino D, McQuinn A, Mardzuki A, Thompson SK, Karapetis CS, Watson DI - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2009)

Bottom Line: Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease.No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified.Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Flinders University Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia;

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer are not suitable for surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients undergoing standard nonsurgical treatment.

Methods: Data of all patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for esophageal cancer were identified from a prospective database.

Results: Seventy-five patients were treated for localized disease, and 52 for metastatic disease at diagnosis. Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a median survival of 10.8 months for all patients. There was a significant difference in survival (p < 0.001) between the groups with versus without metastases, with median survival in the patients without metastases 13.6 months versus 6.5 months in patients with metastases. Patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for localized disease had a five-year survival of 12%. No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified. Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.

Conclusion: In patients with localized disease at diagnosis, long-term survival can be achieved in some patients, whereas five-year survival is rare in patients who present with metastatic disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the metastatic group stratified by histological type. There was no significant difference in survival (log rank test, p = 0.429).
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f3-ceg-2-075: Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the metastatic group stratified by histological type. There was no significant difference in survival (log rank test, p = 0.429).

Mentions: Patients with metastases had no five-year survival. The survival analysis stratified according to histological type is shown in Figure 3. No significant differences between adenocarcinoma and SCC were identified. Median survival for patients with adenocarcinoma was 6.2 months compared to 9.3 months in patients with SCC (p = 0.429). Survival was similar for patients with metastases to distant sites versus nonregional lymph nodes and five-year survival was 0 in both subgroups. Median survival for patients with distant metastasis was 6.5 months compared to 7.7 months in patients with nonregional lymph-node metastasis (p = 0.847).


Outcome for esophageal cancer following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy but not esophagectomy: Nonsurgical treatment of esophageal cancer.

Zingg U, Divalentino D, McQuinn A, Mardzuki A, Thompson SK, Karapetis CS, Watson DI - Clin Exp Gastroenterol (2009)

Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the metastatic group stratified by histological type. There was no significant difference in survival (log rank test, p = 0.429).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108630&req=5

f3-ceg-2-075: Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the metastatic group stratified by histological type. There was no significant difference in survival (log rank test, p = 0.429).
Mentions: Patients with metastases had no five-year survival. The survival analysis stratified according to histological type is shown in Figure 3. No significant differences between adenocarcinoma and SCC were identified. Median survival for patients with adenocarcinoma was 6.2 months compared to 9.3 months in patients with SCC (p = 0.429). Survival was similar for patients with metastases to distant sites versus nonregional lymph nodes and five-year survival was 0 in both subgroups. Median survival for patients with distant metastasis was 6.5 months compared to 7.7 months in patients with nonregional lymph-node metastasis (p = 0.847).

Bottom Line: Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease.No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified.Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Flinders University Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia;

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 50% of patients with esophageal cancer are not suitable for surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients undergoing standard nonsurgical treatment.

Methods: Data of all patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for esophageal cancer were identified from a prospective database.

Results: Seventy-five patients were treated for localized disease, and 52 for metastatic disease at diagnosis. Except for age, which was higher in patients without metastases, there were no significant differences between the patients with vs. without metastatic disease. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a median survival of 10.8 months for all patients. There was a significant difference in survival (p < 0.001) between the groups with versus without metastases, with median survival in the patients without metastases 13.6 months versus 6.5 months in patients with metastases. Patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment for localized disease had a five-year survival of 12%. No significant difference between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was identified. Subanalysis of patients who received chemoradiotherapy revealed similar results to the overall group of patients.

Conclusion: In patients with localized disease at diagnosis, long-term survival can be achieved in some patients, whereas five-year survival is rare in patients who present with metastatic disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus