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Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of paeonia lactiflora pall., a traditional chinese herbal medicine.

He DY, Dai SM - Front Pharmacol (2011)

Bottom Line: The analgesic effect of TGP was confirmed in various animal models of pain, which may be mediated partly by adenosine A1 receptor.TGP was also reported to have protective effects of cells against oxidative stress.In adjuvant arthritis rats, paeoniflorin exerted immunosuppressive effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, Shanghai Guanghua Hospital Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
In China, Korea, and Japan, a decoction of the dried root without bark of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis, dysmenorrhea, muscle cramping and spasms, and fever for more than 1200 years. A water/ethanol extract of the root is now known as total glucosides of peony (TGP), which contains more than 15 components. Paeoniflorin is the most abundant ingredient and accounts for the pharmacological effects observed with TGP in both in vitro and in vivo studies. The analgesic effect of TGP was confirmed in various animal models of pain, which may be mediated partly by adenosine A1 receptor. The direct anti-inflammatory effects of TGP were observed in animal models of both acute and subacute inflammation, by inhibiting the production of prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, and nitric oxide, and by suppressing the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration. TGP was also reported to have protective effects of cells against oxidative stress. In vitro, dual effects of TGP were noted on the proliferation of lymphocytes, differentiation of Th/Ts lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory cytokines and antibodies. In vivo, TGP inhibited the delayed-type hypersensitivity in immuno-activated mice, and enhanced the delayed-type hypersensitivity in immuno-suppressed mice. In adjuvant arthritis rats, paeoniflorin exerted immunosuppressive effects. The beneficial effects of TGP in treating rheumatoid arthritis were verified by randomized controlled trials. The adverse events of TGP were mainly gastrointestinal tract disturbances, mostly mild diarrhea.

No MeSH data available.


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Chemical structures of main components in total glucosides of peony.
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Figure 2: Chemical structures of main components in total glucosides of peony.

Mentions: A water/ethanol extract of Radix Paeoniae Alba is known as total glucosides of peony (TGP), which contains more than 15 components, including paeoniflorin, albiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, benzoylpaeoniflorin, oxybenzoyl-paeoniflorin, paeoniflorigenone, lactiflorin, galloylpaeoniflorin, paeonin, paeonolide, and paeonol (Zhang et al., 2001; Tan et al., 2010). Most of them are monoterpene glucosides, and their structures are shown in Figure 2. Among them, paeoniflorin (C23H28O11, with a molecular weight of 480.45), a water-soluble compound, is the most abundant (>90%) and accounts for the pharmacological effects observed with TGP in both in vitro and in vivo studies. So the content of paeoniflorin is used for the standardization of the dosage of TGP. A preparation of TGP was approved by State Food and Drug Administration of China to enter market as a disease-modifying drug for rheumatoid arthritis in 1998. In recent years, a lot of studies describing the chemistry and the pharmacology of TGP have been published, but often in Chinese. Here, we briefly reviewed the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of TGP.


Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of paeonia lactiflora pall., a traditional chinese herbal medicine.

He DY, Dai SM - Front Pharmacol (2011)

Chemical structures of main components in total glucosides of peony.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108611&req=5

Figure 2: Chemical structures of main components in total glucosides of peony.
Mentions: A water/ethanol extract of Radix Paeoniae Alba is known as total glucosides of peony (TGP), which contains more than 15 components, including paeoniflorin, albiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, benzoylpaeoniflorin, oxybenzoyl-paeoniflorin, paeoniflorigenone, lactiflorin, galloylpaeoniflorin, paeonin, paeonolide, and paeonol (Zhang et al., 2001; Tan et al., 2010). Most of them are monoterpene glucosides, and their structures are shown in Figure 2. Among them, paeoniflorin (C23H28O11, with a molecular weight of 480.45), a water-soluble compound, is the most abundant (>90%) and accounts for the pharmacological effects observed with TGP in both in vitro and in vivo studies. So the content of paeoniflorin is used for the standardization of the dosage of TGP. A preparation of TGP was approved by State Food and Drug Administration of China to enter market as a disease-modifying drug for rheumatoid arthritis in 1998. In recent years, a lot of studies describing the chemistry and the pharmacology of TGP have been published, but often in Chinese. Here, we briefly reviewed the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of TGP.

Bottom Line: The analgesic effect of TGP was confirmed in various animal models of pain, which may be mediated partly by adenosine A1 receptor.TGP was also reported to have protective effects of cells against oxidative stress.In adjuvant arthritis rats, paeoniflorin exerted immunosuppressive effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, Shanghai Guanghua Hospital Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
In China, Korea, and Japan, a decoction of the dried root without bark of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis, dysmenorrhea, muscle cramping and spasms, and fever for more than 1200 years. A water/ethanol extract of the root is now known as total glucosides of peony (TGP), which contains more than 15 components. Paeoniflorin is the most abundant ingredient and accounts for the pharmacological effects observed with TGP in both in vitro and in vivo studies. The analgesic effect of TGP was confirmed in various animal models of pain, which may be mediated partly by adenosine A1 receptor. The direct anti-inflammatory effects of TGP were observed in animal models of both acute and subacute inflammation, by inhibiting the production of prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, and nitric oxide, and by suppressing the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration. TGP was also reported to have protective effects of cells against oxidative stress. In vitro, dual effects of TGP were noted on the proliferation of lymphocytes, differentiation of Th/Ts lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory cytokines and antibodies. In vivo, TGP inhibited the delayed-type hypersensitivity in immuno-activated mice, and enhanced the delayed-type hypersensitivity in immuno-suppressed mice. In adjuvant arthritis rats, paeoniflorin exerted immunosuppressive effects. The beneficial effects of TGP in treating rheumatoid arthritis were verified by randomized controlled trials. The adverse events of TGP were mainly gastrointestinal tract disturbances, mostly mild diarrhea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus