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Invasive cyprinid fish in Europe originate from the single introduction of an admixed source population followed by a complex pattern of spread.

Simon A, Britton R, Gozlan R, van Oosterhout C, Volckaert FA, Hänfling B - PLoS ONE (2011)

Bottom Line: A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range.Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity.Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Evolutionary Biology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom. a.simon@2007.hull.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The Asian cyprinid fish, the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), was introduced into Europe in the 1960s. A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range. Here we analyse a 700 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to examine different models of colonisation and spread within the invasive range, and to investigate the factors that may have contributed to their invasion success. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the introduced populations from continental Europe was higher than that of the native populations, although two recently introduced populations from the British Isles showed low levels of variability. Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity. This suggests that these populations are not in mutation-drift equilibrium, but rather that the relative inflated level of nucleotide diversity is consistent with recent admixture. This study elucidates the colonisation patterns of P. parva in Europe and provides an evolutionary framework of their invasion. It supports the hypothesis that their European colonisation was initiated by their introduction to a single location or small geographic area with subsequent complex pattern of spread including both long distance and stepping-stone dispersal. Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphic representation of the three competing invasion scenarios considered in the DIY ABC analysis.(Description of the scenarios are in the Results section.) Graph of linear regression, showing posterior probabilities of the scenarios.
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pone-0018560-g007: Graphic representation of the three competing invasion scenarios considered in the DIY ABC analysis.(Description of the scenarios are in the Results section.) Graph of linear regression, showing posterior probabilities of the scenarios.

Mentions: Based on the geographic distribution of the haplotype lineages, samples were pooled into three native and one invasive population for which we considered three feasible evolutionary scenarios (Figure 7): (i) pop 1 (native populations of haplotype lineage 1; CG, CK, CY, Minjiang), (ii) pop 2 (admixed native populations from the river Hai He; CH, CRH), (iii) pop 3 (all invasive Hungarian populations; HA, HE, HG, HS), pop 4 (native populations of lineage 2; TI, Yellow River). The Hungarian populations were chosen to represent invasive populations because they were located in close proximity to the original site of introduction. In order to account for the unsampled variation in the native range in lineage 2, one or two ghost population (GH1, GH2) were included in the scenarios (represented as branches without terminal ends in Figure 7). All three scenarios assumed that a founder of size NF that lasted DB generations had event had taken place after introduction into Europe:


Invasive cyprinid fish in Europe originate from the single introduction of an admixed source population followed by a complex pattern of spread.

Simon A, Britton R, Gozlan R, van Oosterhout C, Volckaert FA, Hänfling B - PLoS ONE (2011)

Graphic representation of the three competing invasion scenarios considered in the DIY ABC analysis.(Description of the scenarios are in the Results section.) Graph of linear regression, showing posterior probabilities of the scenarios.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108587&req=5

pone-0018560-g007: Graphic representation of the three competing invasion scenarios considered in the DIY ABC analysis.(Description of the scenarios are in the Results section.) Graph of linear regression, showing posterior probabilities of the scenarios.
Mentions: Based on the geographic distribution of the haplotype lineages, samples were pooled into three native and one invasive population for which we considered three feasible evolutionary scenarios (Figure 7): (i) pop 1 (native populations of haplotype lineage 1; CG, CK, CY, Minjiang), (ii) pop 2 (admixed native populations from the river Hai He; CH, CRH), (iii) pop 3 (all invasive Hungarian populations; HA, HE, HG, HS), pop 4 (native populations of lineage 2; TI, Yellow River). The Hungarian populations were chosen to represent invasive populations because they were located in close proximity to the original site of introduction. In order to account for the unsampled variation in the native range in lineage 2, one or two ghost population (GH1, GH2) were included in the scenarios (represented as branches without terminal ends in Figure 7). All three scenarios assumed that a founder of size NF that lasted DB generations had event had taken place after introduction into Europe:

Bottom Line: A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range.Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity.Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Evolutionary Biology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom. a.simon@2007.hull.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The Asian cyprinid fish, the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), was introduced into Europe in the 1960s. A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range. Here we analyse a 700 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to examine different models of colonisation and spread within the invasive range, and to investigate the factors that may have contributed to their invasion success. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the introduced populations from continental Europe was higher than that of the native populations, although two recently introduced populations from the British Isles showed low levels of variability. Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity. This suggests that these populations are not in mutation-drift equilibrium, but rather that the relative inflated level of nucleotide diversity is consistent with recent admixture. This study elucidates the colonisation patterns of P. parva in Europe and provides an evolutionary framework of their invasion. It supports the hypothesis that their European colonisation was initiated by their introduction to a single location or small geographic area with subsequent complex pattern of spread including both long distance and stepping-stone dispersal. Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus