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Breast Cancer in the Setting of HIV.

Palan M, Shousha S, Krell J, Stebbing J - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: Oncogenesis in immunocompromised patients occurs due to a number of factors including reduced immune surveillance or other viral pathogens.Breast cancer, unlike other non-AIDS-defining cancers, does not appear associated and has rarely been reported.We describe a case with evidence of immune reactivity around the tumor, but not in the tumor itself.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, The Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, and Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Fulham Palace Road, London W6 8RF, UK.

ABSTRACT
Oncogenesis in immunocompromised patients occurs due to a number of factors including reduced immune surveillance or other viral pathogens. Breast cancer, unlike other non-AIDS-defining cancers, does not appear associated and has rarely been reported. We describe a case with evidence of immune reactivity around the tumor, but not in the tumor itself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CD4 (a) and CD8 (b) staining of the tumor sections. Both cell populations were found adjacent to, but not infiltrating, the tumor.
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fig2: CD4 (a) and CD8 (b) staining of the tumor sections. Both cell populations were found adjacent to, but not infiltrating, the tumor.

Mentions: She initially noticed a lump in her right breast, alongside skin and shape changes in the breast and nipple discharge. There was no history of oral contraceptive use, nor any family history of breast/ovarian cancer. Her CD4 count measured 450 cells/mm3 with an HIV-1 viral load of approximately 500 copies/mL. Mammography, ultrasound, and core biopsy of the right breast confirmed the presence of the tumor. Figures of her breast pathology may be seen below (Figures 1 and 2). CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte staining of the tissue sample showed significant lymphocytic infiltration adjacent to the tumor (but not within it).


Breast Cancer in the Setting of HIV.

Palan M, Shousha S, Krell J, Stebbing J - Patholog Res Int (2011)

CD4 (a) and CD8 (b) staining of the tumor sections. Both cell populations were found adjacent to, but not infiltrating, the tumor.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108579&req=5

fig2: CD4 (a) and CD8 (b) staining of the tumor sections. Both cell populations were found adjacent to, but not infiltrating, the tumor.
Mentions: She initially noticed a lump in her right breast, alongside skin and shape changes in the breast and nipple discharge. There was no history of oral contraceptive use, nor any family history of breast/ovarian cancer. Her CD4 count measured 450 cells/mm3 with an HIV-1 viral load of approximately 500 copies/mL. Mammography, ultrasound, and core biopsy of the right breast confirmed the presence of the tumor. Figures of her breast pathology may be seen below (Figures 1 and 2). CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte staining of the tissue sample showed significant lymphocytic infiltration adjacent to the tumor (but not within it).

Bottom Line: Oncogenesis in immunocompromised patients occurs due to a number of factors including reduced immune surveillance or other viral pathogens.Breast cancer, unlike other non-AIDS-defining cancers, does not appear associated and has rarely been reported.We describe a case with evidence of immune reactivity around the tumor, but not in the tumor itself.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, The Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, and Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Fulham Palace Road, London W6 8RF, UK.

ABSTRACT
Oncogenesis in immunocompromised patients occurs due to a number of factors including reduced immune surveillance or other viral pathogens. Breast cancer, unlike other non-AIDS-defining cancers, does not appear associated and has rarely been reported. We describe a case with evidence of immune reactivity around the tumor, but not in the tumor itself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus