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Event-related brain potential investigation of preparation for speech production in late bilinguals.

Wu YJ, Thierry G - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, however, sound repetitions in Chinese elicited significant priming effects even when the rhyming task was performed in English.This cross-language priming effect was delayed by ∼200  ms as compared to the within-language effect and was asymmetric, since there was no priming effect of sound repetitions in English when participants were asked to make rhyming judgments in Chinese.These results demonstrate that second language production hinders, but does not seal off, activation of the first language, whereas native language production appears immune to competition from the second language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
It has been debated how bilinguals select the intended language and prevent interference from the unintended language when speaking. Here, we studied the nature of the mental representations accessed by late fluent bilinguals during a rhyming judgment task relying on covert speech production. We recorded event-related brain potentials in Chinese-English bilinguals and monolingual speakers of English while they indicated whether the names of pictures presented on a screen rhymed.  Whether bilingual participants focussed on rhyming selectively in English or Chinese, we found a significant priming effect of language-specific sound repetition. Surprisingly, however, sound repetitions in Chinese elicited significant priming effects even when the rhyming task was performed in English. This cross-language priming effect was delayed by ∼200  ms as compared to the within-language effect and was asymmetric, since there was no priming effect of sound repetitions in English when participants were asked to make rhyming judgments in Chinese. These results demonstrate that second language production hinders, but does not seal off, activation of the first language, whereas native language production appears immune to competition from the second language.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Event-related potential results of all groups in the rhyming judgment tasks. ERP results for the native English speakers and the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in the English rhyming judgment task are presented to the left of the vertical line (A). ERP results for the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in Chinese rhyming judgment task are presented to the right of the vertical line (B). Waveforms depict brain potential variations from nine central electrodes (FC1, FC2, FCz, C1, C2, Cz, CP1, CP2, CPz). The schematic head shows electrode locations. The shaded areas represent significant differences between conditions (e.g., P  <  0.05) over a minimal period of 30  ms.
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Figure 3: Event-related potential results of all groups in the rhyming judgment tasks. ERP results for the native English speakers and the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in the English rhyming judgment task are presented to the left of the vertical line (A). ERP results for the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in Chinese rhyming judgment task are presented to the right of the vertical line (B). Waveforms depict brain potential variations from nine central electrodes (FC1, FC2, FCz, C1, C2, Cz, CP1, CP2, CPz). The schematic head shows electrode locations. The shaded areas represent significant differences between conditions (e.g., P  <  0.05) over a minimal period of 30  ms.

Mentions: The ERP data was collected simultaneously with behavioral data. In native speakers of English performing the English rhyming task, a repeated ANOVA showed a significant effect of condition on ERP mean amplitude (F3,42  =  19.2, P  <  0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that this effect was accounted for by two differences (Figure 3). Firstly, target pictures that rhymed with prime pictures in terms of English names elicited significantly reduced ERP amplitudes as compared to those rhyming based on Chinese names and unrelated picture names (all Ps  <  0.001). A millisecond-by-millisecond comparison revealed that the significant difference in this comparison started as early as 220  ms after the presentation of the target picture. Secondly, target pictures related in meaning to the prime pictures elicited reduced ERP amplitudes as compared to unrelated pairs of pictures (P  <  0.001), with a similar time course as the priming found for rhyming in English. There was no difference between the ERPs elicited by target pictures whose names rhymed based on Chinese picture names and the ERPs elicited by completely unrelated pictures (P  >  0.1).


Event-related brain potential investigation of preparation for speech production in late bilinguals.

Wu YJ, Thierry G - Front Psychol (2011)

Event-related potential results of all groups in the rhyming judgment tasks. ERP results for the native English speakers and the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in the English rhyming judgment task are presented to the left of the vertical line (A). ERP results for the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in Chinese rhyming judgment task are presented to the right of the vertical line (B). Waveforms depict brain potential variations from nine central electrodes (FC1, FC2, FCz, C1, C2, Cz, CP1, CP2, CPz). The schematic head shows electrode locations. The shaded areas represent significant differences between conditions (e.g., P  <  0.05) over a minimal period of 30  ms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108551&req=5

Figure 3: Event-related potential results of all groups in the rhyming judgment tasks. ERP results for the native English speakers and the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in the English rhyming judgment task are presented to the left of the vertical line (A). ERP results for the Chinese–English bilingual speakers in Chinese rhyming judgment task are presented to the right of the vertical line (B). Waveforms depict brain potential variations from nine central electrodes (FC1, FC2, FCz, C1, C2, Cz, CP1, CP2, CPz). The schematic head shows electrode locations. The shaded areas represent significant differences between conditions (e.g., P  <  0.05) over a minimal period of 30  ms.
Mentions: The ERP data was collected simultaneously with behavioral data. In native speakers of English performing the English rhyming task, a repeated ANOVA showed a significant effect of condition on ERP mean amplitude (F3,42  =  19.2, P  <  0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that this effect was accounted for by two differences (Figure 3). Firstly, target pictures that rhymed with prime pictures in terms of English names elicited significantly reduced ERP amplitudes as compared to those rhyming based on Chinese names and unrelated picture names (all Ps  <  0.001). A millisecond-by-millisecond comparison revealed that the significant difference in this comparison started as early as 220  ms after the presentation of the target picture. Secondly, target pictures related in meaning to the prime pictures elicited reduced ERP amplitudes as compared to unrelated pairs of pictures (P  <  0.001), with a similar time course as the priming found for rhyming in English. There was no difference between the ERPs elicited by target pictures whose names rhymed based on Chinese picture names and the ERPs elicited by completely unrelated pictures (P  >  0.1).

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, however, sound repetitions in Chinese elicited significant priming effects even when the rhyming task was performed in English.This cross-language priming effect was delayed by ∼200  ms as compared to the within-language effect and was asymmetric, since there was no priming effect of sound repetitions in English when participants were asked to make rhyming judgments in Chinese.These results demonstrate that second language production hinders, but does not seal off, activation of the first language, whereas native language production appears immune to competition from the second language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
It has been debated how bilinguals select the intended language and prevent interference from the unintended language when speaking. Here, we studied the nature of the mental representations accessed by late fluent bilinguals during a rhyming judgment task relying on covert speech production. We recorded event-related brain potentials in Chinese-English bilinguals and monolingual speakers of English while they indicated whether the names of pictures presented on a screen rhymed.  Whether bilingual participants focussed on rhyming selectively in English or Chinese, we found a significant priming effect of language-specific sound repetition. Surprisingly, however, sound repetitions in Chinese elicited significant priming effects even when the rhyming task was performed in English. This cross-language priming effect was delayed by ∼200  ms as compared to the within-language effect and was asymmetric, since there was no priming effect of sound repetitions in English when participants were asked to make rhyming judgments in Chinese. These results demonstrate that second language production hinders, but does not seal off, activation of the first language, whereas native language production appears immune to competition from the second language.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus