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Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nevus depigmentosus on the neck of a man. The pigmentary abnormality was present at birth in the patient
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Figure 10: Nevus depigmentosus on the neck of a man. The pigmentary abnormality was present at birth in the patient

Mentions: Unilateral (segmental) vitiligo differs from generalized vitiligo in many important aspects. It more commonly begins in children and young adults and progresses for a limited period, usually 1–2 years, and then remains static for the life of the individual.[35] It affects just one side of the body [Figure 5]. In contrast to bilateral vitiligo, the distribution is asymmetrical on the skin. However, the patterns also are not random. The various sites affected by the depigmentation are repetitious. The patterns on the face have been classified.[3637] There are patterns affecting the neck and trunk which resemble each other in location and shape [Figures 6–8]. It is important to note that a nevus depigmentosus [Figures 9 and 10] and a cafι-au-lait spot can have a similar shape, pattern and location as segmental vitiligo [Figures 11–13]. These similarities of patterns and distribution for unilateral vitiligo and nevus depigmentosus suggest that unilateral vitiligo corresponds to embryological developmental patterns for melanocytes in their migration from the neural crest to the epidermis.


Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Nevus depigmentosus on the neck of a man. The pigmentary abnormality was present at birth in the patient
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108518&req=5

Figure 10: Nevus depigmentosus on the neck of a man. The pigmentary abnormality was present at birth in the patient
Mentions: Unilateral (segmental) vitiligo differs from generalized vitiligo in many important aspects. It more commonly begins in children and young adults and progresses for a limited period, usually 1–2 years, and then remains static for the life of the individual.[35] It affects just one side of the body [Figure 5]. In contrast to bilateral vitiligo, the distribution is asymmetrical on the skin. However, the patterns also are not random. The various sites affected by the depigmentation are repetitious. The patterns on the face have been classified.[3637] There are patterns affecting the neck and trunk which resemble each other in location and shape [Figures 6–8]. It is important to note that a nevus depigmentosus [Figures 9 and 10] and a cafι-au-lait spot can have a similar shape, pattern and location as segmental vitiligo [Figures 11–13]. These similarities of patterns and distribution for unilateral vitiligo and nevus depigmentosus suggest that unilateral vitiligo corresponds to embryological developmental patterns for melanocytes in their migration from the neural crest to the epidermis.

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus