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Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extensive depigmentation of a woman which illustrates the symmetrical distribution of classical bilateral vitiligo
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Figure 4: Extensive depigmentation of a woman which illustrates the symmetrical distribution of classical bilateral vitiligo

Mentions: Bilateral or generalized vitiligo can begin at any age and tends to progress intermittently over the life of the patient. It produces depigmentation that is remarkably symmetrical in distribution [Figures 1–4]. A patch on the right side of the body is matched by a patch in a similar location on the left side. The entire body can depigment although it rarely does so. The classical presentation of the depigmentation is a remarkably symmetrical distribution of depigmentation beginning on the fingers, feet, wrists, elbows, axillae and around the mouth and eyes. There is no explanation for this symmetry. Yet, it is so typical and common that symmetrical depigmentation is one criterion for the diagnosis of vitiligo. (Depigmented patches can be randomly scattered. This has been labeled atypical vitiligo.) Dr. RB Goudie, a Scottish pathologist, was intrigued by the symmetry that characterized vitiligo. He noted that the distribution of some autoimmune endocrine disorders such as thyrotoxicosis resembled in some ways the distribution of vitiligo.[3233] He also noted that malignant lymphomas often appeared as tumors symmetrically involving both sides of the body. He hypothesized that benign lymphocytes honed to specific sites in the skin where they might be responsible for the symmetry of vitiligo.[34] Although his ideas are no longer popular, they are based on the known propensity of cutaneous lymphocytes to migrate to specific sites in the skin and the role of lymphocytes in causing depigmentation. His ideas are worthy of reconsideration.


Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Extensive depigmentation of a woman which illustrates the symmetrical distribution of classical bilateral vitiligo
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108518&req=5

Figure 4: Extensive depigmentation of a woman which illustrates the symmetrical distribution of classical bilateral vitiligo
Mentions: Bilateral or generalized vitiligo can begin at any age and tends to progress intermittently over the life of the patient. It produces depigmentation that is remarkably symmetrical in distribution [Figures 1–4]. A patch on the right side of the body is matched by a patch in a similar location on the left side. The entire body can depigment although it rarely does so. The classical presentation of the depigmentation is a remarkably symmetrical distribution of depigmentation beginning on the fingers, feet, wrists, elbows, axillae and around the mouth and eyes. There is no explanation for this symmetry. Yet, it is so typical and common that symmetrical depigmentation is one criterion for the diagnosis of vitiligo. (Depigmented patches can be randomly scattered. This has been labeled atypical vitiligo.) Dr. RB Goudie, a Scottish pathologist, was intrigued by the symmetry that characterized vitiligo. He noted that the distribution of some autoimmune endocrine disorders such as thyrotoxicosis resembled in some ways the distribution of vitiligo.[3233] He also noted that malignant lymphomas often appeared as tumors symmetrically involving both sides of the body. He hypothesized that benign lymphocytes honed to specific sites in the skin where they might be responsible for the symmetry of vitiligo.[34] Although his ideas are no longer popular, they are based on the known propensity of cutaneous lymphocytes to migrate to specific sites in the skin and the role of lymphocytes in causing depigmentation. His ideas are worthy of reconsideration.

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus