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Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Depigmentation around the eyes (partially blocked), the nares and mouth, all classical and early manifestations of bilateral vitiligo
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Figure 3: Depigmentation around the eyes (partially blocked), the nares and mouth, all classical and early manifestations of bilateral vitiligo

Mentions: Vitiligo is a common and easily recognized disorder for all dermatologists, many physicians and some observant members of the general public. It is a disorder that is characterized by white spots typically first noted on the fingers, knuckles, around the eyes and mouth, and on the feet and genitalia[12] [Figures 1–3]. There are two basic mechanisms whereby the skin can become white.[3] Melanin is synthesized by melanocytes within melanosomes that are transferred into the surrounding keratinocytes. The keratinocytes transport the melanin and melanosomes from the basal layer of the epidermis to the stratum corneum where they are desquamated into the environment.[4] Some disorders inhibit or retard the production of melanin formation and the skin develops hypopigmentation.[3] Such disorders include, among many others, oculocutaneous albinism, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor and nevus depigmentosus. In these disorders, melanocytes are present in normal numbers in the epidermis but produce less than normal amounts of melanin. Typically, the skin exhibits mild to marked hypopigmentation.


Vitiligo: a review of some facts lesser known about depigmentation.

Nordlund JJ - Indian J Dermatol (2011)

Depigmentation around the eyes (partially blocked), the nares and mouth, all classical and early manifestations of bilateral vitiligo
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108518&req=5

Figure 3: Depigmentation around the eyes (partially blocked), the nares and mouth, all classical and early manifestations of bilateral vitiligo
Mentions: Vitiligo is a common and easily recognized disorder for all dermatologists, many physicians and some observant members of the general public. It is a disorder that is characterized by white spots typically first noted on the fingers, knuckles, around the eyes and mouth, and on the feet and genitalia[12] [Figures 1–3]. There are two basic mechanisms whereby the skin can become white.[3] Melanin is synthesized by melanocytes within melanosomes that are transferred into the surrounding keratinocytes. The keratinocytes transport the melanin and melanosomes from the basal layer of the epidermis to the stratum corneum where they are desquamated into the environment.[4] Some disorders inhibit or retard the production of melanin formation and the skin develops hypopigmentation.[3] Such disorders include, among many others, oculocutaneous albinism, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor and nevus depigmentosus. In these disorders, melanocytes are present in normal numbers in the epidermis but produce less than normal amounts of melanin. Typically, the skin exhibits mild to marked hypopigmentation.

Bottom Line: It has three important factors underlying this destruction.The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment.The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio, USA.

ABSTRACT
Vitiligo is a disorder that causes the destruction of melanocytes. It has three important factors underlying this destruction. The depigmented skin has many aberrant functions such as a muted response to contact allergens, a phenomenon also seen in mice that depigment. The white skin of those with vitiligo does not form non-melanoma skin cancers although the white skin of albinos, which has a similar color as vitiligo, is highly susceptible to skin cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus