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Imaging of the Head and Neck following Radiation Treatment.

Debnam JM - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy.Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications.As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy. Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications. Radiation treatment creates a difficult clinical picture for oncologists, head and neck surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neuropathologists. As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal lobe radiation necrosis: (a) Axial contrast-enhanced MR examination of the brain demonstrates a peripherally enhancing focus in the right temporal lobe. (b) Axial fast spin echo T2 sequence shows edema around the focus of radiation necrosis characterized by signal hyperintensity (arrow).
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fig9: Temporal lobe radiation necrosis: (a) Axial contrast-enhanced MR examination of the brain demonstrates a peripherally enhancing focus in the right temporal lobe. (b) Axial fast spin echo T2 sequence shows edema around the focus of radiation necrosis characterized by signal hyperintensity (arrow).

Mentions: Radiation necrosis to the temporal lobes of the brain can occur following radiation treatment of head and neck tumors, notably for lesions of the nasopharynx. The incidence has been reported to be 3% [33]. The earliest sign of temporal lobe necrosis is cerebral edema, which can be extensive [34]. Disparity between clinical and radiologic findings is noteworthy and highly suggestive of temporal lobe necrosis, and enhancing lesions can be located in the gray or white matter [34]. Together with an appropriate history, a presumptive diagnosis can be made, and pathologic proof in most cases is not required [35]. When treated early with corticosteroids, patients can make a complete or near complete recovery with only residual cerebral atrophy (Figure 9) [34].


Imaging of the Head and Neck following Radiation Treatment.

Debnam JM - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Temporal lobe radiation necrosis: (a) Axial contrast-enhanced MR examination of the brain demonstrates a peripherally enhancing focus in the right temporal lobe. (b) Axial fast spin echo T2 sequence shows edema around the focus of radiation necrosis characterized by signal hyperintensity (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108502&req=5

fig9: Temporal lobe radiation necrosis: (a) Axial contrast-enhanced MR examination of the brain demonstrates a peripherally enhancing focus in the right temporal lobe. (b) Axial fast spin echo T2 sequence shows edema around the focus of radiation necrosis characterized by signal hyperintensity (arrow).
Mentions: Radiation necrosis to the temporal lobes of the brain can occur following radiation treatment of head and neck tumors, notably for lesions of the nasopharynx. The incidence has been reported to be 3% [33]. The earliest sign of temporal lobe necrosis is cerebral edema, which can be extensive [34]. Disparity between clinical and radiologic findings is noteworthy and highly suggestive of temporal lobe necrosis, and enhancing lesions can be located in the gray or white matter [34]. Together with an appropriate history, a presumptive diagnosis can be made, and pathologic proof in most cases is not required [35]. When treated early with corticosteroids, patients can make a complete or near complete recovery with only residual cerebral atrophy (Figure 9) [34].

Bottom Line: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy.Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications.As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy. Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications. Radiation treatment creates a difficult clinical picture for oncologists, head and neck surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neuropathologists. As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus