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Imaging of the Head and Neck following Radiation Treatment.

Debnam JM - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy.Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications.As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy. Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications. Radiation treatment creates a difficult clinical picture for oncologists, head and neck surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neuropathologists. As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hyoid bone osteoradionecrosis: (a) Axial contrast enhanced CT of the mandible bone (bone window) shows destruction of the right hyoid bone with soft tissue air (arrow). (b) Axial contrast-enhanced CT (soft tissue window) shows soft tissue ulceration without evidence of an enhancing soft tissue mass (arrow).
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fig3: Hyoid bone osteoradionecrosis: (a) Axial contrast enhanced CT of the mandible bone (bone window) shows destruction of the right hyoid bone with soft tissue air (arrow). (b) Axial contrast-enhanced CT (soft tissue window) shows soft tissue ulceration without evidence of an enhancing soft tissue mass (arrow).

Mentions: The hyoid bone is located inferior to the oral cavity and oropharynx and above the thyroid cartilage. The musculature of the floor of the mouth and the tongue are attached to the hyoid bone, providing assistance in tongue movement and swallowing. Tumor adjacent to the hyoid bone before radiation therapy is a factor that should be considered as putting the hyoid at risk [24] for osteoradionecrosis. Findings of hyoid osteoradionecrosis include fragmentation, cortical disruption, intraosseous or peri-hyoid air, often adjacent to a tongue-base ulceration. The absence of obvious enhancing soft-tissue tumor should suggest hyoid ORN in the radiated patient [24] (Figure 3).


Imaging of the Head and Neck following Radiation Treatment.

Debnam JM - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Hyoid bone osteoradionecrosis: (a) Axial contrast enhanced CT of the mandible bone (bone window) shows destruction of the right hyoid bone with soft tissue air (arrow). (b) Axial contrast-enhanced CT (soft tissue window) shows soft tissue ulceration without evidence of an enhancing soft tissue mass (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108502&req=5

fig3: Hyoid bone osteoradionecrosis: (a) Axial contrast enhanced CT of the mandible bone (bone window) shows destruction of the right hyoid bone with soft tissue air (arrow). (b) Axial contrast-enhanced CT (soft tissue window) shows soft tissue ulceration without evidence of an enhancing soft tissue mass (arrow).
Mentions: The hyoid bone is located inferior to the oral cavity and oropharynx and above the thyroid cartilage. The musculature of the floor of the mouth and the tongue are attached to the hyoid bone, providing assistance in tongue movement and swallowing. Tumor adjacent to the hyoid bone before radiation therapy is a factor that should be considered as putting the hyoid at risk [24] for osteoradionecrosis. Findings of hyoid osteoradionecrosis include fragmentation, cortical disruption, intraosseous or peri-hyoid air, often adjacent to a tongue-base ulceration. The absence of obvious enhancing soft-tissue tumor should suggest hyoid ORN in the radiated patient [24] (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy.Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications.As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck occurs in approximately 40,000 patients annually in the United States and is often treated with radiation therapy. Radiological studies are obtained following treatment for head and neck malignancies to assess for recurrent tumor, posttreatment changes, and associated complications. Radiation treatment creates a difficult clinical picture for oncologists, head and neck surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neuropathologists. As post-treatment imaging studies are often discussed at radiology/pathology working conferences, knowledge of the imaging appearance of radiation-associated changes in the head and neck and the terminology used by neuroradiologists may not only aid in interpretation of the pathologic specimen, but also assist in communications with neuroradiologists and referring clinicians.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus