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A Review of Carcinomas Arising in the Head and Neck Region in HIV-Positive Patients.

Purgina B, Pantanowitz L, Seethala RR - Patholog Res Int (2011)

Bottom Line: Data also suggest that HIV-positive patients with these cancers present at a younger age, with more aggressive disease and worse prognosis compared to HIV-negative patients.Treatment involves surgical resection with or without radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic disease.AIDS patients, however, are more likely to suffer radiation treatment complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Presbyterian-Shadyside University Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

ABSTRACT
The majority of malignancies arising in the head and neck among patients with AIDS are Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with HIV/AIDS are also at increased risk of developing several carcinomas of the head and neck. This paper focuses on these less common, albeit important, carcinomas. An English language literature search identified numerous population-based studies evaluating carcinomas in the head and neck of HIV-positive patients. Published results indicate that patients with HIV/AIDS are at an increased risk of developing mucosal squamous cell carcinoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland, and Merkel cell carcinoma in this anatomic region. Data also suggest that HIV-positive patients with these cancers present at a younger age, with more aggressive disease and worse prognosis compared to HIV-negative patients. Treatment involves surgical resection with or without radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic disease. AIDS patients, however, are more likely to suffer radiation treatment complications. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has not altered the incidence of these malignancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Medium-power view of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nonkeratinizing, undifferentiated type (H&E stain, 200x magnification).  (b) High-power view demonstrating the high-grade malignant cells with indistinct cytoplasmic borders, irregular nuclei with prominent nucleoli (H&E stain, 400x magnification).
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fig5: (a) Medium-power view of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nonkeratinizing, undifferentiated type (H&E stain, 200x magnification). (b) High-power view demonstrating the high-grade malignant cells with indistinct cytoplasmic borders, irregular nuclei with prominent nucleoli (H&E stain, 400x magnification).

Mentions: The WHO defines NPC as a carcinoma arising in the nasopharyngeal mucosa that shows light microscopic or ultrastructural evidence of squamous differentiation. It encompasses keratinizing SCC, nonkeratinizing carcinoma (differentiated or undifferentiated) and basaloid SCC. Adenocarcinoma and salivary-gland-type carcinoma are excluded [62]. The most common site of origin is the lateral wall of the nasopharynx, followed by the superior posterior wall [62]. The histopathologic features (see Figure 5) depend on the histologic subtype but should demonstrate evidence of squamous differentiation either by light or electron microscopy. Close to 100% of patients with nonkeratinizing NPC demonstrate positivity for EBV, whereas keratinizing SCC or NPC demonstrates more conflicting results. These tumors are immunoreactive for pancytokeratins (AE1/AE3) and high-molecular weight cytokeratins (cytokeratin 5/6, 34βE12) [62].


A Review of Carcinomas Arising in the Head and Neck Region in HIV-Positive Patients.

Purgina B, Pantanowitz L, Seethala RR - Patholog Res Int (2011)

(a) Medium-power view of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nonkeratinizing, undifferentiated type (H&E stain, 200x magnification).  (b) High-power view demonstrating the high-grade malignant cells with indistinct cytoplasmic borders, irregular nuclei with prominent nucleoli (H&E stain, 400x magnification).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108450&req=5

fig5: (a) Medium-power view of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nonkeratinizing, undifferentiated type (H&E stain, 200x magnification). (b) High-power view demonstrating the high-grade malignant cells with indistinct cytoplasmic borders, irregular nuclei with prominent nucleoli (H&E stain, 400x magnification).
Mentions: The WHO defines NPC as a carcinoma arising in the nasopharyngeal mucosa that shows light microscopic or ultrastructural evidence of squamous differentiation. It encompasses keratinizing SCC, nonkeratinizing carcinoma (differentiated or undifferentiated) and basaloid SCC. Adenocarcinoma and salivary-gland-type carcinoma are excluded [62]. The most common site of origin is the lateral wall of the nasopharynx, followed by the superior posterior wall [62]. The histopathologic features (see Figure 5) depend on the histologic subtype but should demonstrate evidence of squamous differentiation either by light or electron microscopy. Close to 100% of patients with nonkeratinizing NPC demonstrate positivity for EBV, whereas keratinizing SCC or NPC demonstrates more conflicting results. These tumors are immunoreactive for pancytokeratins (AE1/AE3) and high-molecular weight cytokeratins (cytokeratin 5/6, 34βE12) [62].

Bottom Line: Data also suggest that HIV-positive patients with these cancers present at a younger age, with more aggressive disease and worse prognosis compared to HIV-negative patients.Treatment involves surgical resection with or without radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic disease.AIDS patients, however, are more likely to suffer radiation treatment complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Presbyterian-Shadyside University Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

ABSTRACT
The majority of malignancies arising in the head and neck among patients with AIDS are Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with HIV/AIDS are also at increased risk of developing several carcinomas of the head and neck. This paper focuses on these less common, albeit important, carcinomas. An English language literature search identified numerous population-based studies evaluating carcinomas in the head and neck of HIV-positive patients. Published results indicate that patients with HIV/AIDS are at an increased risk of developing mucosal squamous cell carcinoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, lymphoepithelial carcinoma of the salivary gland, and Merkel cell carcinoma in this anatomic region. Data also suggest that HIV-positive patients with these cancers present at a younger age, with more aggressive disease and worse prognosis compared to HIV-negative patients. Treatment involves surgical resection with or without radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic disease. AIDS patients, however, are more likely to suffer radiation treatment complications. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has not altered the incidence of these malignancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus