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The perspective matters! Multisensory integration in ego-centric reference frames determines full-body ownership.

Petkova VI, Khoshnevis M, Ehrsson HH - Front Psychol (2011)

Bottom Line: Recent advances in experimental science have made it possible to investigate the perceptual processes involved in generating a sense of owning an entire body.Here we investigate the fundamental question of the reference frames used in the process of attributing an entire body to the self.This demonstrates that the multisensory integration processes producing the sense of corporeal self operates in an ego-centric reference frame.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain, Body and Self Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in experimental science have made it possible to investigate the perceptual processes involved in generating a sense of owning an entire body. This is achieved by full-body ownership illusions which make use of specific patterns of visual and somatic stimuli integration. Here we investigate the fundamental question of the reference frames used in the process of attributing an entire body to the self. We quantified the strength of the body-swap illusion in conditions where the participants were observing this artificial body from the perspective of the first or third person. Consistent results from subjective reports and physiological recordings show that the first person visual perspective is critical for the induction of this full-body ownership illusion. This demonstrates that the multisensory integration processes producing the sense of corporeal self operates in an ego-centric reference frame.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental set-up in experiments #1 and #2. (A) Set-up used to create the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the first person perspective. (B,C) Depict what the participants see when they observe the touches or the knife-induced threats in the first person perspective condition. (D) Set-up designed to probe the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the third person perspective. (E,F) Depict the participants’ perspective when they received touches or knife threats in the condition presented from the third person perspective.
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Figure 1: Experimental set-up in experiments #1 and #2. (A) Set-up used to create the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the first person perspective. (B,C) Depict what the participants see when they observe the touches or the knife-induced threats in the first person perspective condition. (D) Set-up designed to probe the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the third person perspective. (E,F) Depict the participants’ perspective when they received touches or knife threats in the condition presented from the third person perspective.

Mentions: During the experiment, participants wore a set of HMDs (Cybermind Visette Pro PAL, Cybermind Interactive, Maastricht, the Netherlands) with a wide field-of-view (diagonal field-of-view = 71.5°; following the procedures described in Petkova and Ehrsson, 2008). These HMDs were connected to two synchronized color CCTV cameras (Protos IV, Vista, Wokingham, Berkshire, UK) attached side-by-side to a special platform mounted on the head of a full size shop mannequin (mannequin #1). The platform upon which the CCTV cameras were mounted was fixed on a rotating axis, which allowed the cameras to be pointed either downward to the body of the mannequin (mannequin #1), or forward toward the body of second identical mannequin (mannequin #2) placed opposite mannequin #1 at a distance of 75 cm from the participant (Figure 1). Thus, the participants could not see their own body but only the body of mannequin #1 or #2 from one or other of the two different points of view (see further below).


The perspective matters! Multisensory integration in ego-centric reference frames determines full-body ownership.

Petkova VI, Khoshnevis M, Ehrsson HH - Front Psychol (2011)

Experimental set-up in experiments #1 and #2. (A) Set-up used to create the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the first person perspective. (B,C) Depict what the participants see when they observe the touches or the knife-induced threats in the first person perspective condition. (D) Set-up designed to probe the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the third person perspective. (E,F) Depict the participants’ perspective when they received touches or knife threats in the condition presented from the third person perspective.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108400&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental set-up in experiments #1 and #2. (A) Set-up used to create the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the first person perspective. (B,C) Depict what the participants see when they observe the touches or the knife-induced threats in the first person perspective condition. (D) Set-up designed to probe the full-body illusion when the mannequin's body is perceived from the third person perspective. (E,F) Depict the participants’ perspective when they received touches or knife threats in the condition presented from the third person perspective.
Mentions: During the experiment, participants wore a set of HMDs (Cybermind Visette Pro PAL, Cybermind Interactive, Maastricht, the Netherlands) with a wide field-of-view (diagonal field-of-view = 71.5°; following the procedures described in Petkova and Ehrsson, 2008). These HMDs were connected to two synchronized color CCTV cameras (Protos IV, Vista, Wokingham, Berkshire, UK) attached side-by-side to a special platform mounted on the head of a full size shop mannequin (mannequin #1). The platform upon which the CCTV cameras were mounted was fixed on a rotating axis, which allowed the cameras to be pointed either downward to the body of the mannequin (mannequin #1), or forward toward the body of second identical mannequin (mannequin #2) placed opposite mannequin #1 at a distance of 75 cm from the participant (Figure 1). Thus, the participants could not see their own body but only the body of mannequin #1 or #2 from one or other of the two different points of view (see further below).

Bottom Line: Recent advances in experimental science have made it possible to investigate the perceptual processes involved in generating a sense of owning an entire body.Here we investigate the fundamental question of the reference frames used in the process of attributing an entire body to the self.This demonstrates that the multisensory integration processes producing the sense of corporeal self operates in an ego-centric reference frame.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain, Body and Self Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in experimental science have made it possible to investigate the perceptual processes involved in generating a sense of owning an entire body. This is achieved by full-body ownership illusions which make use of specific patterns of visual and somatic stimuli integration. Here we investigate the fundamental question of the reference frames used in the process of attributing an entire body to the self. We quantified the strength of the body-swap illusion in conditions where the participants were observing this artificial body from the perspective of the first or third person. Consistent results from subjective reports and physiological recordings show that the first person visual perspective is critical for the induction of this full-body ownership illusion. This demonstrates that the multisensory integration processes producing the sense of corporeal self operates in an ego-centric reference frame.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus