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Investigating the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in the assessment of brands.

Santos JP, Seixas D, Brandão S, Moutinho L - Front Neurosci (2011)

Bottom Line: However, when the decision-making period was separated from the moment after the response, and especially for positive brands, the vmPFC was more active after the choice than during the decision process itself, challenging some of the existing literature.The results of the present study support the notion that the vmPFC may be unimportant in the decision stage of brand preference, questioning theories that postulate that the vmPFC is in the origin of such a choice.Further studies are needed to investigate in detail why the vmPFC seems to be involved in brand preference only after the decision process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Superior Institute of Maia Maia, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is believed to be important in everyday preference judgments, processing emotions during decision-making. However, there is still controversy in the literature regarding the participation of the vmPFC. To further elucidate the contribution of the vmPFC in brand preference, we designed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study where 18 subjects assessed positive, indifferent, and fictitious brands. Also, both the period during and after the decision process were analyzed, hoping to unravel temporally the role of the vmPFC, using modeled and model-free fMRI analysis. Considering together the period before and after decision-making, there was activation of the vmPFC when comparing positive with indifferent or fictitious brands. However, when the decision-making period was separated from the moment after the response, and especially for positive brands, the vmPFC was more active after the choice than during the decision process itself, challenging some of the existing literature. The results of the present study support the notion that the vmPFC may be unimportant in the decision stage of brand preference, questioning theories that postulate that the vmPFC is in the origin of such a choice. Further studies are needed to investigate in detail why the vmPFC seems to be involved in brand preference only after the decision process.

No MeSH data available.


Splitting the duration of the stimulus for one subject. The figure represents the splitting of the first five stimuli of each category (positive, indifferent, and fictitious logos). Lighter areas represent the period until the response (during decision), and darker areas represent the period after the response (passive visualization of the stimulus).
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Figure 2: Splitting the duration of the stimulus for one subject. The figure represents the splitting of the first five stimuli of each category (positive, indifferent, and fictitious logos). Lighter areas represent the period until the response (during decision), and darker areas represent the period after the response (passive visualization of the stimulus).

Mentions: At the individual level two different strategies of analysis were used for comparison. The first strategy was a traditional approach where the hemodynamic response was investigated during the complete time window of the stimulus (6 s). In the second approach the stimulus duration was divided in two: the period before the response (decision-making), and the period after the response (passive period; see Figure 2).


Investigating the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in the assessment of brands.

Santos JP, Seixas D, Brandão S, Moutinho L - Front Neurosci (2011)

Splitting the duration of the stimulus for one subject. The figure represents the splitting of the first five stimuli of each category (positive, indifferent, and fictitious logos). Lighter areas represent the period until the response (during decision), and darker areas represent the period after the response (passive visualization of the stimulus).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108388&req=5

Figure 2: Splitting the duration of the stimulus for one subject. The figure represents the splitting of the first five stimuli of each category (positive, indifferent, and fictitious logos). Lighter areas represent the period until the response (during decision), and darker areas represent the period after the response (passive visualization of the stimulus).
Mentions: At the individual level two different strategies of analysis were used for comparison. The first strategy was a traditional approach where the hemodynamic response was investigated during the complete time window of the stimulus (6 s). In the second approach the stimulus duration was divided in two: the period before the response (decision-making), and the period after the response (passive period; see Figure 2).

Bottom Line: However, when the decision-making period was separated from the moment after the response, and especially for positive brands, the vmPFC was more active after the choice than during the decision process itself, challenging some of the existing literature.The results of the present study support the notion that the vmPFC may be unimportant in the decision stage of brand preference, questioning theories that postulate that the vmPFC is in the origin of such a choice.Further studies are needed to investigate in detail why the vmPFC seems to be involved in brand preference only after the decision process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Superior Institute of Maia Maia, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is believed to be important in everyday preference judgments, processing emotions during decision-making. However, there is still controversy in the literature regarding the participation of the vmPFC. To further elucidate the contribution of the vmPFC in brand preference, we designed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study where 18 subjects assessed positive, indifferent, and fictitious brands. Also, both the period during and after the decision process were analyzed, hoping to unravel temporally the role of the vmPFC, using modeled and model-free fMRI analysis. Considering together the period before and after decision-making, there was activation of the vmPFC when comparing positive with indifferent or fictitious brands. However, when the decision-making period was separated from the moment after the response, and especially for positive brands, the vmPFC was more active after the choice than during the decision process itself, challenging some of the existing literature. The results of the present study support the notion that the vmPFC may be unimportant in the decision stage of brand preference, questioning theories that postulate that the vmPFC is in the origin of such a choice. Further studies are needed to investigate in detail why the vmPFC seems to be involved in brand preference only after the decision process.

No MeSH data available.