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Design of a novel flow-and-shoot microbeam.

Garty G, Grad M, Jones BK, Xu Y, Xu J, Randers-Pehrson G, Attinger D, Brenner DJ - Radiat Prot Dosimetry (2010)

Bottom Line: With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude.The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users.This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RARAF, Columbia University, 136 S. Broadway, Irvington, NY 10533, USA. gyg2101@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Presented here is a novel microbeam technology--the Flow-And-ShooT (FAST) microbeam--under development at RARAF. In this system, cells undergo controlled fluidic transport along a microfluidic channel intersecting the microbeam path. They are imaged and tracked in real-time, using a high-speed camera and dynamically targeted, using a magnetic Point and Shoot system. With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude. The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users. This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

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Error distribution of the predicted position.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108275&req=5

NCQ476F4: Error distribution of the predicted position.

Mentions: Compared the position of the prediction with the actual position in the image In+1.


Design of a novel flow-and-shoot microbeam.

Garty G, Grad M, Jones BK, Xu Y, Xu J, Randers-Pehrson G, Attinger D, Brenner DJ - Radiat Prot Dosimetry (2010)

Error distribution of the predicted position.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108275&req=5

NCQ476F4: Error distribution of the predicted position.
Mentions: Compared the position of the prediction with the actual position in the image In+1.

Bottom Line: With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude.The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users.This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RARAF, Columbia University, 136 S. Broadway, Irvington, NY 10533, USA. gyg2101@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Presented here is a novel microbeam technology--the Flow-And-ShooT (FAST) microbeam--under development at RARAF. In this system, cells undergo controlled fluidic transport along a microfluidic channel intersecting the microbeam path. They are imaged and tracked in real-time, using a high-speed camera and dynamically targeted, using a magnetic Point and Shoot system. With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude. The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users. This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

Show MeSH