Limits...
Design of a novel flow-and-shoot microbeam.

Garty G, Grad M, Jones BK, Xu Y, Xu J, Randers-Pehrson G, Attinger D, Brenner DJ - Radiat Prot Dosimetry (2010)

Bottom Line: With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude.The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users.This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RARAF, Columbia University, 136 S. Broadway, Irvington, NY 10533, USA. gyg2101@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Presented here is a novel microbeam technology--the Flow-And-ShooT (FAST) microbeam--under development at RARAF. In this system, cells undergo controlled fluidic transport along a microfluidic channel intersecting the microbeam path. They are imaged and tracked in real-time, using a high-speed camera and dynamically targeted, using a magnetic Point and Shoot system. With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude. The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users. This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

Show MeSH
A mould for microchannel machined into PMMA using a micromilling machine.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108275&req=5

NCQ476F1: A mould for microchannel machined into PMMA using a micromilling machine.

Mentions: The microfluidic channels used in this work were manufactured using soft lithography(9). Since the channel width is larger than 100 μm, moulds were made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slabs using a computer numerical controlled micromilling lathe (Minimill 3, Minitech Machinery). The accuracy of the lathe is between 2 and 5 μm, with the surface roughness being on the order of 100 nm. Micro-endmills are commercially available with a diameter down to 25 μm. The length scales of milled microgeometries (50 μm to several millimetres) bridge the gap between the conventional macroscale machining (millimetre to metre) and lithography (nm to 100 μm). The advantages of micromilling over UV lithography are that (1) a clean room is not required; (2) the cumbersome process of drawing and ordering photolithographic masks is replaced by the software generation of numerical commands to the milling machine out of a computer drawing and (3) the possibility to mill non-planar surfaces. A picture of a mould created with the micromilling machine is shown in Figure 1.Figure 1.


Design of a novel flow-and-shoot microbeam.

Garty G, Grad M, Jones BK, Xu Y, Xu J, Randers-Pehrson G, Attinger D, Brenner DJ - Radiat Prot Dosimetry (2010)

A mould for microchannel machined into PMMA using a micromilling machine.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108275&req=5

NCQ476F1: A mould for microchannel machined into PMMA using a micromilling machine.
Mentions: The microfluidic channels used in this work were manufactured using soft lithography(9). Since the channel width is larger than 100 μm, moulds were made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slabs using a computer numerical controlled micromilling lathe (Minimill 3, Minitech Machinery). The accuracy of the lathe is between 2 and 5 μm, with the surface roughness being on the order of 100 nm. Micro-endmills are commercially available with a diameter down to 25 μm. The length scales of milled microgeometries (50 μm to several millimetres) bridge the gap between the conventional macroscale machining (millimetre to metre) and lithography (nm to 100 μm). The advantages of micromilling over UV lithography are that (1) a clean room is not required; (2) the cumbersome process of drawing and ordering photolithographic masks is replaced by the software generation of numerical commands to the milling machine out of a computer drawing and (3) the possibility to mill non-planar surfaces. A picture of a mould created with the micromilling machine is shown in Figure 1.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude.The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users.This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: RARAF, Columbia University, 136 S. Broadway, Irvington, NY 10533, USA. gyg2101@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Presented here is a novel microbeam technology--the Flow-And-ShooT (FAST) microbeam--under development at RARAF. In this system, cells undergo controlled fluidic transport along a microfluidic channel intersecting the microbeam path. They are imaged and tracked in real-time, using a high-speed camera and dynamically targeted, using a magnetic Point and Shoot system. With the proposed FAST system, RARAF expects to reach a throughput of 100,000 cells per hour, which will allow increasing the throughput of experiments by at least one order of magnitude. The implementation of FAST will also allow the irradiation of non-adherent cells (e.g. lymphocytes), which is of great interest to many of the RARAF users. This study presents the design of a FAST microbeam and results of first tests of imaging and tracking as well as a discussion of the achievable throughput.

Show MeSH