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Effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients on the genome-wide profiles and coccidiosis resistance in the broiler chickens.

Lillehoj HS, Kim DK, Bravo DM, Lee SH - BMC Proc (2011)

Bottom Line: To validate their immunomodulatory effects in a disease model, young broiler chickens fed a standard diet supplemented with three phytochemicals (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin) from one day post-hatch were orally challenged with E. acervulina.The most reliable network induced by dietary cinnamaldehyde treatment was related with the functions of antigen presentation, humoral immune response, and inflammatory disease.The results of this study provide clear evidence to support the idea that plant-derived phytochemicals possess immune-enhancing properties in chickens and these new findings create a new possibility to develop effective drug-free alternative strategies for disease control for poultry infectious diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Animal and Natural Resources Institute, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Hyun.Lillehoj@ars.usda.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and Capsicum oleoresin, on the translational regulation of genes associated with immunology, physiology and metabolism using high-throughput microarray analysis and in vivo disease challenge model of avian coccidiosis.

Methods: In this study, we used nutrigenomics technology to investigate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of dietary modulation of host innate immunity and metabolism by three phytonutrients. To validate their immunomodulatory effects in a disease model, young broiler chickens fed a standard diet supplemented with three phytochemicals (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin) from one day post-hatch were orally challenged with E. acervulina. The body weight gain and fecal oocyst production were used to evaluate coccidiosis disease parameters.

Results: Analysis of global gene expression profiles of intestinal tissues from phytonutrient-fed birds indicated that Capsicum oleoresin induced the most gene changes compared to the control group where many of these genes were associated with those of metabolism and immunity. The most reliable network induced by dietary cinnamaldehyde treatment was related with the functions of antigen presentation, humoral immune response, and inflammatory disease. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with these phytonutrients significantly protected broiler chickens against live coccidiosis challenge infection based on body weight and parasite fecundity.

Conclusions: The results of this study provide clear evidence to support the idea that plant-derived phytochemicals possess immune-enhancing properties in chickens and these new findings create a new possibility to develop effective drug-free alternative strategies for disease control for poultry infectious diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between the expression levels of selected genes from microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. CD74 molecule (CD74); ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (UBE2I); CDC5 cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L); CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2); Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain (FADD).
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Figure 1: Comparison between the expression levels of selected genes from microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. CD74 molecule (CD74); ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (UBE2I); CDC5 cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L); CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2); Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain (FADD).

Mentions: To confirm the results of microarray analysis, we selected five genes and followed the kinetics of their corresponding transcript levels following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. All of the selected genes showed > 2.0-fold altered expression in the normalized AVIELA data (P < 0.05). Of these, two (CD74 and CDC5L) were associated with the first network and another two (UBE31 and FADD) were included in the second network of pathway analysis. As shown in Figure 1, the transcriptional changes in these genes as assessed by qRT-PCR showed similar patterns when compared with the original microarray data.


Effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients on the genome-wide profiles and coccidiosis resistance in the broiler chickens.

Lillehoj HS, Kim DK, Bravo DM, Lee SH - BMC Proc (2011)

Comparison between the expression levels of selected genes from microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. CD74 molecule (CD74); ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (UBE2I); CDC5 cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L); CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2); Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain (FADD).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108230&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison between the expression levels of selected genes from microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. CD74 molecule (CD74); ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (UBE2I); CDC5 cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L); CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2); Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain (FADD).
Mentions: To confirm the results of microarray analysis, we selected five genes and followed the kinetics of their corresponding transcript levels following dietary supplementation with Capsicum oleoresin. All of the selected genes showed > 2.0-fold altered expression in the normalized AVIELA data (P < 0.05). Of these, two (CD74 and CDC5L) were associated with the first network and another two (UBE31 and FADD) were included in the second network of pathway analysis. As shown in Figure 1, the transcriptional changes in these genes as assessed by qRT-PCR showed similar patterns when compared with the original microarray data.

Bottom Line: To validate their immunomodulatory effects in a disease model, young broiler chickens fed a standard diet supplemented with three phytochemicals (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin) from one day post-hatch were orally challenged with E. acervulina.The most reliable network induced by dietary cinnamaldehyde treatment was related with the functions of antigen presentation, humoral immune response, and inflammatory disease.The results of this study provide clear evidence to support the idea that plant-derived phytochemicals possess immune-enhancing properties in chickens and these new findings create a new possibility to develop effective drug-free alternative strategies for disease control for poultry infectious diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Animal and Natural Resources Institute, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Hyun.Lillehoj@ars.usda.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary plant-derived phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and Capsicum oleoresin, on the translational regulation of genes associated with immunology, physiology and metabolism using high-throughput microarray analysis and in vivo disease challenge model of avian coccidiosis.

Methods: In this study, we used nutrigenomics technology to investigate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of dietary modulation of host innate immunity and metabolism by three phytonutrients. To validate their immunomodulatory effects in a disease model, young broiler chickens fed a standard diet supplemented with three phytochemicals (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin) from one day post-hatch were orally challenged with E. acervulina. The body weight gain and fecal oocyst production were used to evaluate coccidiosis disease parameters.

Results: Analysis of global gene expression profiles of intestinal tissues from phytonutrient-fed birds indicated that Capsicum oleoresin induced the most gene changes compared to the control group where many of these genes were associated with those of metabolism and immunity. The most reliable network induced by dietary cinnamaldehyde treatment was related with the functions of antigen presentation, humoral immune response, and inflammatory disease. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with these phytonutrients significantly protected broiler chickens against live coccidiosis challenge infection based on body weight and parasite fecundity.

Conclusions: The results of this study provide clear evidence to support the idea that plant-derived phytochemicals possess immune-enhancing properties in chickens and these new findings create a new possibility to develop effective drug-free alternative strategies for disease control for poultry infectious diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus