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Analysis of global transcriptional responses of chicken following primary and secondary Eimeria acervulina infections.

Kim CH, Lillehoj HS, Hong YH, Keeler CL, Lillehoj EP - BMC Proc (2011)

Bottom Line: Gene Ontology analysis showed that primary infection significantly modulated the levels of mRNAs for genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates as well as those for innate immune-related genes.The observed modulation in transcript levels for gene related to energy metabolism and immunity occurred concurrent with the clinical signs of coccidiosis.Our results suggest that altered expression of a specific set of host genes induced by Eimeria infection may be responsible, in part, for the observed reduction in body weight gain and inflammatory gut damage that characterizes avian coccidiosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Animal and Natural Resources Institute, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Hyun.Lillehoj@ars.usda.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: Characterization of host transcriptional responses during coccidia infections can provide new clues for the development of alternative disease control strategies against these complex protozoan pathogens.

Methods: In the current study, we compared chicken duodenal transcriptome profiles following primary and secondary infections with Eimeria acervulina using a 9.6K avian intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cDNA microarray (AVIELA).

Results: Gene Ontology analysis showed that primary infection significantly modulated the levels of mRNAs for genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates as well as those for innate immune-related genes. By contrast, secondary infection increased the levels of transcripts encoded by genes related to humoral immunity and reduced the levels of transcripts for the innate immune-related genes. The observed modulation in transcript levels for gene related to energy metabolism and immunity occurred concurrent with the clinical signs of coccidiosis.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that altered expression of a specific set of host genes induced by Eimeria infection may be responsible, in part, for the observed reduction in body weight gain and inflammatory gut damage that characterizes avian coccidiosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of significantly up- or down-regulated elements (p < 0.05) during primary or secondary E. acervulina infections.
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Figure 1: Summary of significantly up- or down-regulated elements (p < 0.05) during primary or secondary E. acervulina infections.

Mentions: Because the variances in fold changes of elements were large during primary infection, the cut-off value for statistical significance was assigned as ≥ 2.0-fold for increased expression and ≤ 0.5-fold for decreased expression, respectively. In the case of secondary infection, variance was relatively lower and cut-off values were ≥1.5-fold and ≤ 0.66-fold for up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. The total numbers of up- or down-regulated transcripts during primary infection were larger than those altered during secondary infection, 189 vs. 124 up-regulated transcripts during primary vs. secondary infection and 199 vs. 159 down-regulated transcripts during primary vs. secondary infection (Fig 1)


Analysis of global transcriptional responses of chicken following primary and secondary Eimeria acervulina infections.

Kim CH, Lillehoj HS, Hong YH, Keeler CL, Lillehoj EP - BMC Proc (2011)

Summary of significantly up- or down-regulated elements (p < 0.05) during primary or secondary E. acervulina infections.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108206&req=5

Figure 1: Summary of significantly up- or down-regulated elements (p < 0.05) during primary or secondary E. acervulina infections.
Mentions: Because the variances in fold changes of elements were large during primary infection, the cut-off value for statistical significance was assigned as ≥ 2.0-fold for increased expression and ≤ 0.5-fold for decreased expression, respectively. In the case of secondary infection, variance was relatively lower and cut-off values were ≥1.5-fold and ≤ 0.66-fold for up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. The total numbers of up- or down-regulated transcripts during primary infection were larger than those altered during secondary infection, 189 vs. 124 up-regulated transcripts during primary vs. secondary infection and 199 vs. 159 down-regulated transcripts during primary vs. secondary infection (Fig 1)

Bottom Line: Gene Ontology analysis showed that primary infection significantly modulated the levels of mRNAs for genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates as well as those for innate immune-related genes.The observed modulation in transcript levels for gene related to energy metabolism and immunity occurred concurrent with the clinical signs of coccidiosis.Our results suggest that altered expression of a specific set of host genes induced by Eimeria infection may be responsible, in part, for the observed reduction in body weight gain and inflammatory gut damage that characterizes avian coccidiosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Animal and Natural Resources Institute, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. Hyun.Lillehoj@ars.usda.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: Characterization of host transcriptional responses during coccidia infections can provide new clues for the development of alternative disease control strategies against these complex protozoan pathogens.

Methods: In the current study, we compared chicken duodenal transcriptome profiles following primary and secondary infections with Eimeria acervulina using a 9.6K avian intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cDNA microarray (AVIELA).

Results: Gene Ontology analysis showed that primary infection significantly modulated the levels of mRNAs for genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and carbohydrates as well as those for innate immune-related genes. By contrast, secondary infection increased the levels of transcripts encoded by genes related to humoral immunity and reduced the levels of transcripts for the innate immune-related genes. The observed modulation in transcript levels for gene related to energy metabolism and immunity occurred concurrent with the clinical signs of coccidiosis.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that altered expression of a specific set of host genes induced by Eimeria infection may be responsible, in part, for the observed reduction in body weight gain and inflammatory gut damage that characterizes avian coccidiosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus