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Comparing distributions of environmental outcomes for regulatory environmental justice analysis.

Maguire K, Sheriff G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: As environmental justice (EJ) emerged as an ethical issue in the 1970s, the academic literature has provided statistical analyses of the incidence and causes of various environmental outcomes as they relate to race, income, and other demographic variables.In the context of regulatory impacts, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding what information is relevant for EJ analysis, and how best to present it.This paper helps frame the discussion by suggesting a set of questions fundamental to regulatory EJ analysis, reviewing past approaches to quantifying distributional equity, and discussing the potential for adapting existing tools to the regulatory context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Environmental Economics, US Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, MC 1809T, Washington, DC 20460, USA. maguire.kelly@epa.gov

ABSTRACT
Economists have long been interested in measuring distributional impacts of policy interventions. As environmental justice (EJ) emerged as an ethical issue in the 1970s, the academic literature has provided statistical analyses of the incidence and causes of various environmental outcomes as they relate to race, income, and other demographic variables. In the context of regulatory impacts, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding what information is relevant for EJ analysis, and how best to present it. This paper helps frame the discussion by suggesting a set of questions fundamental to regulatory EJ analysis, reviewing past approaches to quantifying distributional equity, and discussing the potential for adapting existing tools to the regulatory context.

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Lorenz curves.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f1-ijerph-08-01707: Lorenz curves.

Mentions: Lorenz Curves. If one accepts the ethical premise that it is always desirable to transfer a unit of pollution away from a highly exposed individual to a lesser exposed one, then Lorenz curves provide a means of ranking policy outcomes. Some hypothetical Lorenz curves for distribution of a pollutant are depicted in Figure 1. The horizontal axis of the graph indicates percentiles of the population ranked by pollution exposure: 10 corresponds to the ten percent of the population least exposed to the pollutant, 50 corresponds to the half of the population least exposed to pollution, etc. The vertical axis represents the percent of pollution exposed by percentile. The black diagonal line depicts a perfectly equal distribution of exposure: the lowest 10 percent of the population experience 10 percent of the exposure the lowest 50 percent of the population experience half the exposure, etc.


Comparing distributions of environmental outcomes for regulatory environmental justice analysis.

Maguire K, Sheriff G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Lorenz curves.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108136&req=5

f1-ijerph-08-01707: Lorenz curves.
Mentions: Lorenz Curves. If one accepts the ethical premise that it is always desirable to transfer a unit of pollution away from a highly exposed individual to a lesser exposed one, then Lorenz curves provide a means of ranking policy outcomes. Some hypothetical Lorenz curves for distribution of a pollutant are depicted in Figure 1. The horizontal axis of the graph indicates percentiles of the population ranked by pollution exposure: 10 corresponds to the ten percent of the population least exposed to the pollutant, 50 corresponds to the half of the population least exposed to pollution, etc. The vertical axis represents the percent of pollution exposed by percentile. The black diagonal line depicts a perfectly equal distribution of exposure: the lowest 10 percent of the population experience 10 percent of the exposure the lowest 50 percent of the population experience half the exposure, etc.

Bottom Line: As environmental justice (EJ) emerged as an ethical issue in the 1970s, the academic literature has provided statistical analyses of the incidence and causes of various environmental outcomes as they relate to race, income, and other demographic variables.In the context of regulatory impacts, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding what information is relevant for EJ analysis, and how best to present it.This paper helps frame the discussion by suggesting a set of questions fundamental to regulatory EJ analysis, reviewing past approaches to quantifying distributional equity, and discussing the potential for adapting existing tools to the regulatory context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Center for Environmental Economics, US Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, MC 1809T, Washington, DC 20460, USA. maguire.kelly@epa.gov

ABSTRACT
Economists have long been interested in measuring distributional impacts of policy interventions. As environmental justice (EJ) emerged as an ethical issue in the 1970s, the academic literature has provided statistical analyses of the incidence and causes of various environmental outcomes as they relate to race, income, and other demographic variables. In the context of regulatory impacts, however, there is a lack of consensus regarding what information is relevant for EJ analysis, and how best to present it. This paper helps frame the discussion by suggesting a set of questions fundamental to regulatory EJ analysis, reviewing past approaches to quantifying distributional equity, and discussing the potential for adapting existing tools to the regulatory context.

Show MeSH