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Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

Kadambala R, Townsend TG, Jain P, Singh K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported.After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time.The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, PO BOX 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. kadambalar@cdm.com

ABSTRACT
Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

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A plan view showing (a) the lined cells at New River Regional Landfill (NRRL) and the area of the moisture addition well (Well 2) and the 18 piezometer wells used; and (b) the respective locations of the liquids addition well and piezometer wells.
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f1-ijerph-08-01692: A plan view showing (a) the lined cells at New River Regional Landfill (NRRL) and the area of the moisture addition well (Well 2) and the 18 piezometer wells used; and (b) the respective locations of the liquids addition well and piezometer wells.

Mentions: The experiment centered upon a 12-m deep buried vertical well (20-cm diameter, Well 2) augured into the compacted waste at NRRL using a 20-cm hollow stem open flight auger. The screen length of the buried vertical well was 10.5-m from the bottom of the well. Figure 1 shows the location of the experiment with respect to the landfill cells; a second vertical well (Well 1) was installed, but leachate was not added to this well during the experiments reported in this paper.


Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

Kadambala R, Townsend TG, Jain P, Singh K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

A plan view showing (a) the lined cells at New River Regional Landfill (NRRL) and the area of the moisture addition well (Well 2) and the 18 piezometer wells used; and (b) the respective locations of the liquids addition well and piezometer wells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108135&req=5

f1-ijerph-08-01692: A plan view showing (a) the lined cells at New River Regional Landfill (NRRL) and the area of the moisture addition well (Well 2) and the 18 piezometer wells used; and (b) the respective locations of the liquids addition well and piezometer wells.
Mentions: The experiment centered upon a 12-m deep buried vertical well (20-cm diameter, Well 2) augured into the compacted waste at NRRL using a 20-cm hollow stem open flight auger. The screen length of the buried vertical well was 10.5-m from the bottom of the well. Figure 1 shows the location of the experiment with respect to the landfill cells; a second vertical well (Well 1) was installed, but leachate was not added to this well during the experiments reported in this paper.

Bottom Line: While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported.After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time.The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, PO BOX 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. kadambalar@cdm.com

ABSTRACT
Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth.

Show MeSH