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Heavy drinking is associated with poor blood pressure control in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.

Judd SE, McClure LA, Howard VJ, Lackland DT, Halanych JH, Kabagambe EK - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: Diabetes and gender significantly modified (interaction P < 0.05 for both) the association between alcohol use and hypertension, although heavy drinking remained associated with increased odds of hypertension in sub-group analyses.We did not observe the previously described J-shaped relationship in any sub-group except white females.These data suggest heavy alcohol consumption is associated with poor BP control and that heavy drinkers may want to consider limiting alcohol intake in order to manage hypertension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1665 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. sejudd@uab.edu

ABSTRACT
Alcohol intake has been shown to have a J-shaped association with blood pressure (BP). However, this association has not been examined in mixed race populations or in people with diabetes where tighter blood pressure control is recommended. Participants in the REGARDS study who were 45 years or older (n = 30,239) were included. Medical history (including self-reported alcohol intake) was collected by telephone while blood collection and clinical measurements were done during an in-home visit. We defined diabetes as use of medications and/or fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL and hypertension as use of blood pressure lowering medications and/or BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg or BP ≥ 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes. After adjustment for confounders, heavy drinking was associated with an increased odds of hypertension (OR = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.37, 1.87). Diabetes and gender significantly modified (interaction P < 0.05 for both) the association between alcohol use and hypertension, although heavy drinking remained associated with increased odds of hypertension in sub-group analyses. We did not observe the previously described J-shaped relationship in any sub-group except white females. These data suggest heavy alcohol consumption is associated with poor BP control and that heavy drinkers may want to consider limiting alcohol intake in order to manage hypertension.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) by alcohol use pattern (defined according to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) guidelines) among The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants. The association of SBP with alcohol use differed by race (P = 0.02) and gender (P < 0.001). Models adjust for age, region of residence, income, education, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, HDL, LDL, CRP, and history of stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. We defined alcohol use: none, moderate (1 drink per day for women or 2 drinks per day for men) and heavy alcohol use (greater than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men).
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f2-ijerph-08-01601: Adjusted mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) by alcohol use pattern (defined according to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) guidelines) among The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants. The association of SBP with alcohol use differed by race (P = 0.02) and gender (P < 0.001). Models adjust for age, region of residence, income, education, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, HDL, LDL, CRP, and history of stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. We defined alcohol use: none, moderate (1 drink per day for women or 2 drinks per day for men) and heavy alcohol use (greater than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men).

Mentions: In analyses of adjusted mean SBP in each of the three alcohol use categories stratified by race and gender grouping (Figure 2). The association differed by race (P for interaction = 0.02) and by gender (P for interaction < 0.001) and by gender-race grouping (P for interaction < 0.001). In blacks (regardless of gender), there was not a statistically significant association between alcohol use and SBP, although there was a trend for increasing SBP from non-drinkers to heavy drinkers in analyses that controlled for covariates. In whites (regardless of gender), adjusted mean SBP was higher (P < 0.01) in heavy drinkers than in moderate drinkers and non-drinkers.


Heavy drinking is associated with poor blood pressure control in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.

Judd SE, McClure LA, Howard VJ, Lackland DT, Halanych JH, Kabagambe EK - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Adjusted mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) by alcohol use pattern (defined according to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) guidelines) among The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants. The association of SBP with alcohol use differed by race (P = 0.02) and gender (P < 0.001). Models adjust for age, region of residence, income, education, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, HDL, LDL, CRP, and history of stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. We defined alcohol use: none, moderate (1 drink per day for women or 2 drinks per day for men) and heavy alcohol use (greater than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108130&req=5

f2-ijerph-08-01601: Adjusted mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) by alcohol use pattern (defined according to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) guidelines) among The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants. The association of SBP with alcohol use differed by race (P = 0.02) and gender (P < 0.001). Models adjust for age, region of residence, income, education, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, HDL, LDL, CRP, and history of stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. We defined alcohol use: none, moderate (1 drink per day for women or 2 drinks per day for men) and heavy alcohol use (greater than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men).
Mentions: In analyses of adjusted mean SBP in each of the three alcohol use categories stratified by race and gender grouping (Figure 2). The association differed by race (P for interaction = 0.02) and by gender (P for interaction < 0.001) and by gender-race grouping (P for interaction < 0.001). In blacks (regardless of gender), there was not a statistically significant association between alcohol use and SBP, although there was a trend for increasing SBP from non-drinkers to heavy drinkers in analyses that controlled for covariates. In whites (regardless of gender), adjusted mean SBP was higher (P < 0.01) in heavy drinkers than in moderate drinkers and non-drinkers.

Bottom Line: Diabetes and gender significantly modified (interaction P < 0.05 for both) the association between alcohol use and hypertension, although heavy drinking remained associated with increased odds of hypertension in sub-group analyses.We did not observe the previously described J-shaped relationship in any sub-group except white females.These data suggest heavy alcohol consumption is associated with poor BP control and that heavy drinkers may want to consider limiting alcohol intake in order to manage hypertension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1665 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. sejudd@uab.edu

ABSTRACT
Alcohol intake has been shown to have a J-shaped association with blood pressure (BP). However, this association has not been examined in mixed race populations or in people with diabetes where tighter blood pressure control is recommended. Participants in the REGARDS study who were 45 years or older (n = 30,239) were included. Medical history (including self-reported alcohol intake) was collected by telephone while blood collection and clinical measurements were done during an in-home visit. We defined diabetes as use of medications and/or fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL and hypertension as use of blood pressure lowering medications and/or BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg or BP ≥ 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes. After adjustment for confounders, heavy drinking was associated with an increased odds of hypertension (OR = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.37, 1.87). Diabetes and gender significantly modified (interaction P < 0.05 for both) the association between alcohol use and hypertension, although heavy drinking remained associated with increased odds of hypertension in sub-group analyses. We did not observe the previously described J-shaped relationship in any sub-group except white females. These data suggest heavy alcohol consumption is associated with poor BP control and that heavy drinkers may want to consider limiting alcohol intake in order to manage hypertension.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus