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Source reduction behavior as an independent measurement of the impact of a public health education campaign in an integrated vector management program for the Asian tiger mosquito.

Bartlett-Healy K, Hamilton G, Healy S, Crepeau T, Unlu I, Farajollahi A, Fonseca D, Gaugler R, Clark GG, Strickman D - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Bottom Line: Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior.Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control.Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Vector Biology, Rutgers University, 180 Jones Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. krisb@rci.rutgers.edu

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3) no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in the number of containers found in 2009, by container type. Disposable containers are defined as those that no longer serve a purpose and/or are unwanted by the homeowner. Moveable containers are defined as being able to be moved by a 5-year old child. Differences in containers are between the first (April) and last (September) container surveys. Data is represented as mean number of containers per 50 homes ± the standard error.
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f1-ijerph-08-01358: Change in the number of containers found in 2009, by container type. Disposable containers are defined as those that no longer serve a purpose and/or are unwanted by the homeowner. Moveable containers are defined as being able to be moved by a 5-year old child. Differences in containers are between the first (April) and last (September) container surveys. Data is represented as mean number of containers per 50 homes ± the standard error.

Mentions: Before educational interventions were performed, the highest percentages of containers in backyards were categorized as non-disposable and moveable (Figure 1). Examples of these types of containers included trashcans (31.8%), buckets (16.7%), planters and plant dishes (11.2%), and toys (10%). The second most abundant container type were those that were both disposable and moveable, such as bottles and cans (35.9%), and plastic bags (18.3%). There were few containers that were both non-moveable and non-disposable, such as large planters (11.4%), bird baths (10%), and children’s pools (6%). Lastly, the fewest containers were found in the category for disposable and non-moveable, such as filled trash bags (38.8%), and appliances (4%). We found the largest reductions in containers that were moveable (F = 9.36, P = 0.012), compared to those that were non-moveable (F = 1.37, P = 0.269), disposable (F = 1.28, P = 0.284), and non-disposable (F = 2.7, P = 0.130).


Source reduction behavior as an independent measurement of the impact of a public health education campaign in an integrated vector management program for the Asian tiger mosquito.

Bartlett-Healy K, Hamilton G, Healy S, Crepeau T, Unlu I, Farajollahi A, Fonseca D, Gaugler R, Clark GG, Strickman D - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2011)

Change in the number of containers found in 2009, by container type. Disposable containers are defined as those that no longer serve a purpose and/or are unwanted by the homeowner. Moveable containers are defined as being able to be moved by a 5-year old child. Differences in containers are between the first (April) and last (September) container surveys. Data is represented as mean number of containers per 50 homes ± the standard error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108114&req=5

f1-ijerph-08-01358: Change in the number of containers found in 2009, by container type. Disposable containers are defined as those that no longer serve a purpose and/or are unwanted by the homeowner. Moveable containers are defined as being able to be moved by a 5-year old child. Differences in containers are between the first (April) and last (September) container surveys. Data is represented as mean number of containers per 50 homes ± the standard error.
Mentions: Before educational interventions were performed, the highest percentages of containers in backyards were categorized as non-disposable and moveable (Figure 1). Examples of these types of containers included trashcans (31.8%), buckets (16.7%), planters and plant dishes (11.2%), and toys (10%). The second most abundant container type were those that were both disposable and moveable, such as bottles and cans (35.9%), and plastic bags (18.3%). There were few containers that were both non-moveable and non-disposable, such as large planters (11.4%), bird baths (10%), and children’s pools (6%). Lastly, the fewest containers were found in the category for disposable and non-moveable, such as filled trash bags (38.8%), and appliances (4%). We found the largest reductions in containers that were moveable (F = 9.36, P = 0.012), compared to those that were non-moveable (F = 1.37, P = 0.269), disposable (F = 1.28, P = 0.284), and non-disposable (F = 2.7, P = 0.130).

Bottom Line: Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior.Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control.Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Vector Biology, Rutgers University, 180 Jones Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. krisb@rci.rutgers.edu

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3) no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus