Limits...
Traditional Japanese formula kigikenchuto accelerates healing of pressure-loading skin ulcer in rats.

Kimura M, Shibahara N, Hikiami H, Yoshida T, Jo M, Kaneko M, Nogami T, Fujimoto M, Goto H, Shimada Y - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

Bottom Line: Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing.By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I).These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT), a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days) and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I). These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3D-HPLC profile of kigikenchuto. The peaks of guiding compounds included in each crude-drug component of kigikenchuto— paeoniflorin, cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde, astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, 6-gingerol, ligustilide, and so forth,—are presented.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108106&req=5

fig1: 3D-HPLC profile of kigikenchuto. The peaks of guiding compounds included in each crude-drug component of kigikenchuto— paeoniflorin, cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde, astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, 6-gingerol, ligustilide, and so forth,—are presented.

Mentions: A three-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (3D-HPLC) profile of KKT extract is shown in Figure 1. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions were as follows: KKT extract (0.2 g) was dissolved in 2 ml 70% acetonitrile under ultrasonication. The solution was filtered with membrane filter (0.45 μm pore size; Millipore Corp., Billerica, Mass) prior to injection. The HPLC apparatus was a SD-8020 system (Tosoh Corp., Tokyo, Japan) consisting of a CCPM-II multisolvent delivery pump and a PD-8020 photodiode array detector. A TSK gel ODS-80TS column (4.6 × 150 mm i.d., 5 μm, Tosoh Corp.) was used for analysis. The gradient elution was in accordance with that reported previously [27]. Briefly, the mobile phase consisted of (A) 0.017% phosphoric acid and (B) acetonitrile. The gradient elution was programmed as follows: 0–5 min, 18–20% B; 5–9 min, 20–25% B; 9–15 min, 25–29% B; 15–18 min, 29-29% B; 18–26 min, 39–43% B; 26–34 min, 43–65% B; 34–40 min, 65-65% B. The other analysis conditions were as follows: flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; injection volume, 10 μl; UV scan 200–300 nm.


Traditional Japanese formula kigikenchuto accelerates healing of pressure-loading skin ulcer in rats.

Kimura M, Shibahara N, Hikiami H, Yoshida T, Jo M, Kaneko M, Nogami T, Fujimoto M, Goto H, Shimada Y - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2011)

3D-HPLC profile of kigikenchuto. The peaks of guiding compounds included in each crude-drug component of kigikenchuto— paeoniflorin, cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde, astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, 6-gingerol, ligustilide, and so forth,—are presented.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108106&req=5

fig1: 3D-HPLC profile of kigikenchuto. The peaks of guiding compounds included in each crude-drug component of kigikenchuto— paeoniflorin, cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde, astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, 6-gingerol, ligustilide, and so forth,—are presented.
Mentions: A three-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography (3D-HPLC) profile of KKT extract is shown in Figure 1. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) conditions were as follows: KKT extract (0.2 g) was dissolved in 2 ml 70% acetonitrile under ultrasonication. The solution was filtered with membrane filter (0.45 μm pore size; Millipore Corp., Billerica, Mass) prior to injection. The HPLC apparatus was a SD-8020 system (Tosoh Corp., Tokyo, Japan) consisting of a CCPM-II multisolvent delivery pump and a PD-8020 photodiode array detector. A TSK gel ODS-80TS column (4.6 × 150 mm i.d., 5 μm, Tosoh Corp.) was used for analysis. The gradient elution was in accordance with that reported previously [27]. Briefly, the mobile phase consisted of (A) 0.017% phosphoric acid and (B) acetonitrile. The gradient elution was programmed as follows: 0–5 min, 18–20% B; 5–9 min, 20–25% B; 9–15 min, 25–29% B; 15–18 min, 29-29% B; 18–26 min, 39–43% B; 26–34 min, 43–65% B; 34–40 min, 65-65% B. The other analysis conditions were as follows: flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; injection volume, 10 μl; UV scan 200–300 nm.

Bottom Line: Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing.By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I).These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Japanese Oriental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT), a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days) and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA-) positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α) in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I). These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus