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Screening of immigrants in the UK for imported latent tuberculosis: a multicentre cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis.

Pareek M, Watson JP, Ormerod LP, Kon OM, Woltmann G, White PJ, Abubakar I, Lalvani A - Lancet Infect Dis (2011)

Bottom Line: In our multicentre cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis we analysed demographic and test results from three centres in the UK (from 2008 to 2010) that used interferon-γ release-assay (IGRA) to screen immigrants aged 35 years or younger for latent tuberculosis infection.Positive results were independently associated with increases in tuberculosis incidence in immigrants' countries of origin (p=0·0006), male sex (p = 0·046), and age (p < 0·0001).Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK.

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Study flow diagram*Data for non-attendees available for only two of the three centres in the study.
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fig1: Study flow diagram*Data for non-attendees available for only two of the three centres in the study.

Mentions: Recruitment into the study is outlined in figure 1. Table 1 shows the demographics of the screened population (n=1229). 1193 (97%) of screened immigrants were mostly young adults (aged 16–35 years) and attendees were less likely to be male than female (odds ratio [OR] 0·6, 95% CI 0·5–0·9). Data for previous BCG vaccination were available for only 657 participants, of whom about 80% had been vaccinated. Screened immigrants most commonly originated from the Indian subcontinent and sub-Saharan Africa; Pakistan and India were the most common countries of origin (32% and 26%, respectively). Overall, the screened immigrants were broadly representative of the foreign-born population in the UK; however, our study population contained slightly more immigrants from the Indian subcontinent, and slightly fewer from sub-Saharan Africa than the national average.31


Screening of immigrants in the UK for imported latent tuberculosis: a multicentre cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis.

Pareek M, Watson JP, Ormerod LP, Kon OM, Woltmann G, White PJ, Abubakar I, Lalvani A - Lancet Infect Dis (2011)

Study flow diagram*Data for non-attendees available for only two of the three centres in the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108102&req=5

fig1: Study flow diagram*Data for non-attendees available for only two of the three centres in the study.
Mentions: Recruitment into the study is outlined in figure 1. Table 1 shows the demographics of the screened population (n=1229). 1193 (97%) of screened immigrants were mostly young adults (aged 16–35 years) and attendees were less likely to be male than female (odds ratio [OR] 0·6, 95% CI 0·5–0·9). Data for previous BCG vaccination were available for only 657 participants, of whom about 80% had been vaccinated. Screened immigrants most commonly originated from the Indian subcontinent and sub-Saharan Africa; Pakistan and India were the most common countries of origin (32% and 26%, respectively). Overall, the screened immigrants were broadly representative of the foreign-born population in the UK; however, our study population contained slightly more immigrants from the Indian subcontinent, and slightly fewer from sub-Saharan Africa than the national average.31

Bottom Line: In our multicentre cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis we analysed demographic and test results from three centres in the UK (from 2008 to 2010) that used interferon-γ release-assay (IGRA) to screen immigrants aged 35 years or younger for latent tuberculosis infection.Positive results were independently associated with increases in tuberculosis incidence in immigrants' countries of origin (p=0·0006), male sex (p = 0·046), and age (p < 0·0001).Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus