Limits...
The Dynamics of Oxidized LDL during Atherogenesis.

Itabe H, Obama T, Kato R - J Lipids (2011)

Bottom Line: OxLDL has many stimulatory effects on vascular cells, and the presence of OxLDL in circulating blood has been established.However, recent studies on time-course changes of OxLDL in vivo raised a possibility that OxLDL can be transferred between the lesions and the circulation.In this paper, the in vivo dynamics of OxLDL are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) is a useful marker for cardiovascular disease. The uptake of OxLDL by scavenger receptors leads to the accumulation of cholesterol within the foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions. OxLDL has many stimulatory effects on vascular cells, and the presence of OxLDL in circulating blood has been established. According to the classical hypothesis, OxLDL accumulates in the atherosclerotic lesions over a long duration, leading to advanced lesions. However, recent studies on time-course changes of OxLDL in vivo raised a possibility that OxLDL can be transferred between the lesions and the circulation. In this paper, the in vivo dynamics of OxLDL are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal changes in plasma OxLDL levels and atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice. Male apoE-KO mice were maintained on normal diet up to 40 weeks. The atherosclerotic lesion on the aortic surface increased sharply after 20 weeks. Plasma OxLDL levels increased at 20 weeks just before the lesions began growing. The plasma OxLDL levels seem to decrease concomitantly with an increase in the size of the lesion (cited from [41] with modification).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108093&req=5

fig1: Temporal changes in plasma OxLDL levels and atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice. Male apoE-KO mice were maintained on normal diet up to 40 weeks. The atherosclerotic lesion on the aortic surface increased sharply after 20 weeks. Plasma OxLDL levels increased at 20 weeks just before the lesions began growing. The plasma OxLDL levels seem to decrease concomitantly with an increase in the size of the lesion (cited from [41] with modification).

Mentions: The time-course behavior of OxLDL during the early stages of atherogenesis was investigated. To utilize apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-KO) mice, a modified sandwich ELISA procedure was used to determine the murine circulating OxLDL level [42]. ApoE-KO mice develop atherosclerotic lesions even when fed normal diet. The lesion area was less than 1% of the whole aortic surface at 10 weeks, but it gradually increased after 20 weeks, and it grew up to 32% by 40 weeks of age (Figure 1). The OxLDL level was 0.006 ng/micro g LDL at 6 weeks, but it was elevated to 0.042 ng/micro g LDL at 20 weeks and then decreased by 60% to 0.018 ng/micro g LDL at 28 weeks. This temporal rise in OxLDL occurred before the size expansion of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta. This observation suggests that the OxLDL is generated during atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice in vivo. Reduction in the plasma OxLDL level coincided with the increase in the development of the lesion and accumulation of OxLDL in the atherosclerotic intima. One possible explanation is that plasma OxLDL can transfer into intimal lesions.


The Dynamics of Oxidized LDL during Atherogenesis.

Itabe H, Obama T, Kato R - J Lipids (2011)

Temporal changes in plasma OxLDL levels and atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice. Male apoE-KO mice were maintained on normal diet up to 40 weeks. The atherosclerotic lesion on the aortic surface increased sharply after 20 weeks. Plasma OxLDL levels increased at 20 weeks just before the lesions began growing. The plasma OxLDL levels seem to decrease concomitantly with an increase in the size of the lesion (cited from [41] with modification).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108093&req=5

fig1: Temporal changes in plasma OxLDL levels and atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice. Male apoE-KO mice were maintained on normal diet up to 40 weeks. The atherosclerotic lesion on the aortic surface increased sharply after 20 weeks. Plasma OxLDL levels increased at 20 weeks just before the lesions began growing. The plasma OxLDL levels seem to decrease concomitantly with an increase in the size of the lesion (cited from [41] with modification).
Mentions: The time-course behavior of OxLDL during the early stages of atherogenesis was investigated. To utilize apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-KO) mice, a modified sandwich ELISA procedure was used to determine the murine circulating OxLDL level [42]. ApoE-KO mice develop atherosclerotic lesions even when fed normal diet. The lesion area was less than 1% of the whole aortic surface at 10 weeks, but it gradually increased after 20 weeks, and it grew up to 32% by 40 weeks of age (Figure 1). The OxLDL level was 0.006 ng/micro g LDL at 6 weeks, but it was elevated to 0.042 ng/micro g LDL at 20 weeks and then decreased by 60% to 0.018 ng/micro g LDL at 28 weeks. This temporal rise in OxLDL occurred before the size expansion of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta. This observation suggests that the OxLDL is generated during atherogenesis in apoE-KO mice in vivo. Reduction in the plasma OxLDL level coincided with the increase in the development of the lesion and accumulation of OxLDL in the atherosclerotic intima. One possible explanation is that plasma OxLDL can transfer into intimal lesions.

Bottom Line: OxLDL has many stimulatory effects on vascular cells, and the presence of OxLDL in circulating blood has been established.However, recent studies on time-course changes of OxLDL in vivo raised a possibility that OxLDL can be transferred between the lesions and the circulation.In this paper, the in vivo dynamics of OxLDL are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Chemistry, Showa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) is a useful marker for cardiovascular disease. The uptake of OxLDL by scavenger receptors leads to the accumulation of cholesterol within the foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions. OxLDL has many stimulatory effects on vascular cells, and the presence of OxLDL in circulating blood has been established. According to the classical hypothesis, OxLDL accumulates in the atherosclerotic lesions over a long duration, leading to advanced lesions. However, recent studies on time-course changes of OxLDL in vivo raised a possibility that OxLDL can be transferred between the lesions and the circulation. In this paper, the in vivo dynamics of OxLDL are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus