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Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

SU example of suppression as the ISI is varied with two different probe tone frequencies. The ISI is indicated above each SRF. Left column: the receptive field (RF) and SRFs for the 2-kHz probe condition. Right column: the SRFs for the 5-kHz probe condition. Each panel shows FTCs or SFTCs (white lines), regions of maximum masking (grey lines), probe conditions (black and white crosses), and bootstrapped mean and standard deviations of SCF and SBF, as per Figs 1 and 2.
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fig05: SU example of suppression as the ISI is varied with two different probe tone frequencies. The ISI is indicated above each SRF. Left column: the receptive field (RF) and SRFs for the 2-kHz probe condition. Right column: the SRFs for the 5-kHz probe condition. Each panel shows FTCs or SFTCs (white lines), regions of maximum masking (grey lines), probe conditions (black and white crosses), and bootstrapped mean and standard deviations of SCF and SBF, as per Figs 1 and 2.

Mentions: The example shown in Fig. 2C had multiple peaks in the excitatory RF. In each condition, the SCF and SBF tend towards the probe tone frequency. However, the range of conditioner tones that suppress the 8-kHz probe tone is larger than the range of conditioner tones that suppress the 2.5-kHz probe tone. There is also some suggestion that suppression for the 8-kHz probe is centred on the upper lobe in the excitatory RF, at 10 kHz. Clear multi-peaked tuning curves were relatively rare in our sample (12 units). While it was clear that suppressed tuning was biased towards the probe tone, there was frequently evidence that local features in the RF, near to the probe frequency, also had an influence on tuning. Figure 2D shows another example of a multi-peaked tuning curve in which suppression tended to gravitate towards the peak in the excitatory tuning curve that was nearest to the probe frequency (see also Fig. 5).


Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

SU example of suppression as the ISI is varied with two different probe tone frequencies. The ISI is indicated above each SRF. Left column: the receptive field (RF) and SRFs for the 2-kHz probe condition. Right column: the SRFs for the 5-kHz probe condition. Each panel shows FTCs or SFTCs (white lines), regions of maximum masking (grey lines), probe conditions (black and white crosses), and bootstrapped mean and standard deviations of SCF and SBF, as per Figs 1 and 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108068&req=5

fig05: SU example of suppression as the ISI is varied with two different probe tone frequencies. The ISI is indicated above each SRF. Left column: the receptive field (RF) and SRFs for the 2-kHz probe condition. Right column: the SRFs for the 5-kHz probe condition. Each panel shows FTCs or SFTCs (white lines), regions of maximum masking (grey lines), probe conditions (black and white crosses), and bootstrapped mean and standard deviations of SCF and SBF, as per Figs 1 and 2.
Mentions: The example shown in Fig. 2C had multiple peaks in the excitatory RF. In each condition, the SCF and SBF tend towards the probe tone frequency. However, the range of conditioner tones that suppress the 8-kHz probe tone is larger than the range of conditioner tones that suppress the 2.5-kHz probe tone. There is also some suggestion that suppression for the 8-kHz probe is centred on the upper lobe in the excitatory RF, at 10 kHz. Clear multi-peaked tuning curves were relatively rare in our sample (12 units). While it was clear that suppressed tuning was biased towards the probe tone, there was frequently evidence that local features in the RF, near to the probe frequency, also had an influence on tuning. Figure 2D shows another example of a multi-peaked tuning curve in which suppression tended to gravitate towards the peak in the excitatory tuning curve that was nearest to the probe frequency (see also Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus