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Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Variation of the suppressed characteristic frequency (SCF) with the probe frequency across the population, for an ISI of zero. (A) The distance between the probe and the characteristic frequency (CF) in octaves is shown on the abscissa, and the distance between the SCF and the CF in octaves is shown on the ordinate for SUs (open circles) and MUs (black points). Grey points indicate data where SCF was less reliably estimated. (B) Histogram showing the probe-following index (PFI) of the SCF for SUs (open bars) and MUs (black bars). Grey line shows the PFI for less reliably estimated SCFs. (C) The variation in PFI for probe frequencies at different distances away from CF (black lines show SU and MU data where SCF was accurately measured; grey lines show data where SCF was less reliable).
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fig03: Variation of the suppressed characteristic frequency (SCF) with the probe frequency across the population, for an ISI of zero. (A) The distance between the probe and the characteristic frequency (CF) in octaves is shown on the abscissa, and the distance between the SCF and the CF in octaves is shown on the ordinate for SUs (open circles) and MUs (black points). Grey points indicate data where SCF was less reliably estimated. (B) Histogram showing the probe-following index (PFI) of the SCF for SUs (open bars) and MUs (black bars). Grey line shows the PFI for less reliably estimated SCFs. (C) The variation in PFI for probe frequencies at different distances away from CF (black lines show SU and MU data where SCF was accurately measured; grey lines show data where SCF was less reliable).

Mentions: To characterize the locus of suppression (SCF for the tuning of suppression near to threshold or SBF for the conditioner frequency that suppresses most effectively) relative to the single-tone excitatory CF (or BF) and the probe tone frequency, a probe-following index (PFI) was calculated. This characterizes the angle that each data point forms with the horizontal axis of the representation shown in Figs 3 and 4. In the figures, the difference between unit CF and the SCF in octaves [log2(CF/SCF)] is plotted against the difference between the frequency of the probe and CF [log2(CF/Fprobe)]. The PFI for the SCF is given by: (1) where Fprobe is the frequency of the probe. A value of 1 corresponds to points that followed the probe tone frequency perfectly. In such cases SCF = Fprobe, and points lie on the ascending diagonal in the figures. A value of zero indicates that the SCF was identical to the CF (the numerator in Eq. 1 is then a log of 1, which is 0). For the calculation of the PFI associated with the region of maximal suppression, the BF and SBF measures were used.


Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

Variation of the suppressed characteristic frequency (SCF) with the probe frequency across the population, for an ISI of zero. (A) The distance between the probe and the characteristic frequency (CF) in octaves is shown on the abscissa, and the distance between the SCF and the CF in octaves is shown on the ordinate for SUs (open circles) and MUs (black points). Grey points indicate data where SCF was less reliably estimated. (B) Histogram showing the probe-following index (PFI) of the SCF for SUs (open bars) and MUs (black bars). Grey line shows the PFI for less reliably estimated SCFs. (C) The variation in PFI for probe frequencies at different distances away from CF (black lines show SU and MU data where SCF was accurately measured; grey lines show data where SCF was less reliable).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108068&req=5

fig03: Variation of the suppressed characteristic frequency (SCF) with the probe frequency across the population, for an ISI of zero. (A) The distance between the probe and the characteristic frequency (CF) in octaves is shown on the abscissa, and the distance between the SCF and the CF in octaves is shown on the ordinate for SUs (open circles) and MUs (black points). Grey points indicate data where SCF was less reliably estimated. (B) Histogram showing the probe-following index (PFI) of the SCF for SUs (open bars) and MUs (black bars). Grey line shows the PFI for less reliably estimated SCFs. (C) The variation in PFI for probe frequencies at different distances away from CF (black lines show SU and MU data where SCF was accurately measured; grey lines show data where SCF was less reliable).
Mentions: To characterize the locus of suppression (SCF for the tuning of suppression near to threshold or SBF for the conditioner frequency that suppresses most effectively) relative to the single-tone excitatory CF (or BF) and the probe tone frequency, a probe-following index (PFI) was calculated. This characterizes the angle that each data point forms with the horizontal axis of the representation shown in Figs 3 and 4. In the figures, the difference between unit CF and the SCF in octaves [log2(CF/SCF)] is plotted against the difference between the frequency of the probe and CF [log2(CF/Fprobe)]. The PFI for the SCF is given by: (1) where Fprobe is the frequency of the probe. A value of 1 corresponds to points that followed the probe tone frequency perfectly. In such cases SCF = Fprobe, and points lie on the ascending diagonal in the figures. A value of zero indicates that the SCF was identical to the CF (the numerator in Eq. 1 is then a log of 1, which is 0). For the calculation of the PFI associated with the region of maximal suppression, the BF and SBF measures were used.

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus