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Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

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Four examples of forward suppression for different probe frequencies. Same conventions as Fig. 1. (A) SU example where there is little effect of the probe frequency. (B) MU example where three different probe frequencies were presented. (C) SU example of the effect of varying the probe frequency in a complex tuning curve. (D) Another example of a SU with a multi-peaked excitatory tuning curve. RF, receptive field.
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fig02: Four examples of forward suppression for different probe frequencies. Same conventions as Fig. 1. (A) SU example where there is little effect of the probe frequency. (B) MU example where three different probe frequencies were presented. (C) SU example of the effect of varying the probe frequency in a complex tuning curve. (D) Another example of a SU with a multi-peaked excitatory tuning curve. RF, receptive field.

Mentions: Four more examples are displayed in Fig. 2. The example shown in Fig. 2A demonstrates that the suppression was not always strongly influenced by the probe tone frequency. For both probe tones, the SCF and SBF are closer to the CF than to the probe tone frequency. There are, however, differences between the SRFs for the two probe tone frequencies. The 1.7-kHz (below CF) probe tone is less strongly suppressed by above CF tones than when the probe is at 3.4 kHz (above CF). In the example shown in Fig. 2B, there is only a subtle expansion of the tuning curve towards the probe frequency for a probe frequency below CF (Fig. 2B; 3-kHz probe), compared with when the probe tone frequency is closer to unit CF; whereas, when the probe is above CF (14 kHz) there is a clear shift in the SRF.


Forward suppression in the auditory cortex is frequency-specific.

Scholes C, Palmer AR, Sumner CJ - Eur. J. Neurosci. (2011)

Four examples of forward suppression for different probe frequencies. Same conventions as Fig. 1. (A) SU example where there is little effect of the probe frequency. (B) MU example where three different probe frequencies were presented. (C) SU example of the effect of varying the probe frequency in a complex tuning curve. (D) Another example of a SU with a multi-peaked excitatory tuning curve. RF, receptive field.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3108068&req=5

fig02: Four examples of forward suppression for different probe frequencies. Same conventions as Fig. 1. (A) SU example where there is little effect of the probe frequency. (B) MU example where three different probe frequencies were presented. (C) SU example of the effect of varying the probe frequency in a complex tuning curve. (D) Another example of a SU with a multi-peaked excitatory tuning curve. RF, receptive field.
Mentions: Four more examples are displayed in Fig. 2. The example shown in Fig. 2A demonstrates that the suppression was not always strongly influenced by the probe tone frequency. For both probe tones, the SCF and SBF are closer to the CF than to the probe tone frequency. There are, however, differences between the SRFs for the two probe tone frequencies. The 1.7-kHz (below CF) probe tone is less strongly suppressed by above CF tones than when the probe is at 3.4 kHz (above CF). In the example shown in Fig. 2B, there is only a subtle expansion of the tuning curve towards the probe frequency for a probe frequency below CF (Fig. 2B; 3-kHz probe), compared with when the probe tone frequency is closer to unit CF; whereas, when the probe is above CF (14 kHz) there is a clear shift in the SRF.

Bottom Line: The temporal order and frequency proximity of sounds influence both their perception and neuronal responses.These effects are larger when the two sounds are spectrally similar.These data are consistent with the idea that cortical neurons receive convergent inputs with a wide range of tuning properties that can adapt independently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus