Limits...
How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Urothelial carcinoma with muscolaris propria invasion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3107770&req=5

Figure 13: Urothelial carcinoma with muscolaris propria invasion.

Mentions: (See also comments related to MCQ 12) The level of invasion of the lamina propria is related to patient outcome, with a worse prognosis for tumours that invade beyond the muscularis mucosae (pT1b) [14] or deeply into the subepithelial connective tissue, as quantitated using an ocular micrometer. The WHO 2004 group recommended that some estimate of extent of lamina propria invasion (for example: pT1a - above or into muscularis mucosae vs. pT1b - tumours below) (Figure 13) [2] be provided but this is currently not a formal part of the 2002 TNM system, and it is not universally reported, since there is no established method that is consistently applicable and reproducible. In fact it is often difficult to identify the depth of lamina propria invasion due to the lack of orientation in the transurethral resection (TUR) chips or because of the absence of muscularis mucosae and thick-walled vessels. Nevertheless, pathologists are encouraged to provide some assessment as to the extent of lamina propria invasion. If the tumour invades muscularis mucosae, it should be mentioned in the report unambiguously so that the urologist does not confuse muscularis mucosae with muscularis propria. The presence or absence of muscularis propria in the specimen should always be mentioned, even in cases of noninvasive disease, with the purpose of giving feedback to the urologist as to the depth of the biopsy [14].


How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Urothelial carcinoma with muscolaris propria invasion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3107770&req=5

Figure 13: Urothelial carcinoma with muscolaris propria invasion.
Mentions: (See also comments related to MCQ 12) The level of invasion of the lamina propria is related to patient outcome, with a worse prognosis for tumours that invade beyond the muscularis mucosae (pT1b) [14] or deeply into the subepithelial connective tissue, as quantitated using an ocular micrometer. The WHO 2004 group recommended that some estimate of extent of lamina propria invasion (for example: pT1a - above or into muscularis mucosae vs. pT1b - tumours below) (Figure 13) [2] be provided but this is currently not a formal part of the 2002 TNM system, and it is not universally reported, since there is no established method that is consistently applicable and reproducible. In fact it is often difficult to identify the depth of lamina propria invasion due to the lack of orientation in the transurethral resection (TUR) chips or because of the absence of muscularis mucosae and thick-walled vessels. Nevertheless, pathologists are encouraged to provide some assessment as to the extent of lamina propria invasion. If the tumour invades muscularis mucosae, it should be mentioned in the report unambiguously so that the urologist does not confuse muscularis mucosae with muscularis propria. The presence or absence of muscularis propria in the specimen should always be mentioned, even in cases of noninvasive disease, with the purpose of giving feedback to the urologist as to the depth of the biopsy [14].

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus