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How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Urothelial carcinoma with endophytic growth pattern.
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Figure 11: Urothelial carcinoma with endophytic growth pattern.

Mentions: Some papillary urothelial carcinomas exhibit a prominent endophytic growth pattern resulting in considerable difficulty in assessing invasion [13]. Endophytic growth is evident either as inter-anastomosing cords and columns of urothelium, often with a striking resemblance to inverted papilloma (inverted papilloma-like pattern), or as broad, pushing bulbous invaginations into the lamina propria (broad-front pattern) (Figure 11). Distinction from inverted papilloma requires attention to architectural and cytological features. A diagnosis of invasion requires the unquestionable presence within the lamina propria of irregularly shaped nests or single cells that may have evoked a desmoplastic or inflammatory response. A stromal response may be absent. In such instances, irregularity of the contours of the invasive nests, architectural complexity, and recognition of single-cell invasion are helpful. Occasionally, the cells in the invading nests appear morphologically different from the cells at the base of the tumour, and they may appear as smaller aggregates present within empty spaces. These spaces may mimic vascular invasion closely, but they are believed to be retraction artifacts.


How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Urothelial carcinoma with endophytic growth pattern.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3107770&req=5

Figure 11: Urothelial carcinoma with endophytic growth pattern.
Mentions: Some papillary urothelial carcinomas exhibit a prominent endophytic growth pattern resulting in considerable difficulty in assessing invasion [13]. Endophytic growth is evident either as inter-anastomosing cords and columns of urothelium, often with a striking resemblance to inverted papilloma (inverted papilloma-like pattern), or as broad, pushing bulbous invaginations into the lamina propria (broad-front pattern) (Figure 11). Distinction from inverted papilloma requires attention to architectural and cytological features. A diagnosis of invasion requires the unquestionable presence within the lamina propria of irregularly shaped nests or single cells that may have evoked a desmoplastic or inflammatory response. A stromal response may be absent. In such instances, irregularity of the contours of the invasive nests, architectural complexity, and recognition of single-cell invasion are helpful. Occasionally, the cells in the invading nests appear morphologically different from the cells at the base of the tumour, and they may appear as smaller aggregates present within empty spaces. These spaces may mimic vascular invasion closely, but they are believed to be retraction artifacts.

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus