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How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

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Inverted urothelial papilloma.
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Figure 10: Inverted urothelial papilloma.

Mentions: Inverted papilloma is a distinct clinical pathologic entity typically arising in the trigone region in a younger patient population than papillary neoplasms. Grossly inverted papilloma typically shows an exophytic polypoid growth pattern. Histologically it consists of anastomosing trabeculae of urothelium covered by a normal or attenuated urothelium (Figure 10). There is no significant nuclear pleomorphism and few mitoses can be seen. Squamous or glandular differentiation may be present. In TUR material the fragmentation of the lesion may result in apparent true papillary structures making diagnosis difficult. Distinction from papillary carcinoma with an inverted growth pattern can be problematic (See below). Cases of synchronous inverted papilloma and papillary carcinoma are well described. It is associated with a low risk of recurrence (< 5%) [11]. Recent genetic data supports the idea that inverted papilloma is not related to papillary urothelial neoplasms [12].


How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Inverted urothelial papilloma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3107770&req=5

Figure 10: Inverted urothelial papilloma.
Mentions: Inverted papilloma is a distinct clinical pathologic entity typically arising in the trigone region in a younger patient population than papillary neoplasms. Grossly inverted papilloma typically shows an exophytic polypoid growth pattern. Histologically it consists of anastomosing trabeculae of urothelium covered by a normal or attenuated urothelium (Figure 10). There is no significant nuclear pleomorphism and few mitoses can be seen. Squamous or glandular differentiation may be present. In TUR material the fragmentation of the lesion may result in apparent true papillary structures making diagnosis difficult. Distinction from papillary carcinoma with an inverted growth pattern can be problematic (See below). Cases of synchronous inverted papilloma and papillary carcinoma are well described. It is associated with a low risk of recurrence (< 5%) [11]. Recent genetic data supports the idea that inverted papilloma is not related to papillary urothelial neoplasms [12].

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus