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How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Normal urothelium.
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Figure 1: Normal urothelium.

Mentions: Urothelium (Figure 1) is a multilayered epithelium of the urinary bladder, ureters, and renal pelvis in which the cells mature to form the very large surface "umbrella cells." The thickness of the normal urothelium varies with the state of distension of the bladder (2 to 4 cell layers when dilated and 5 to 7 layers when contracted) [3]. The urothelium of the renal pelvis, urethra and the bladder neck is usually composed of slightly larger cells, which have diminished cytoplasmic clearing and hence may be misinterpreted as dysplasia. Umbrella cells may show some degree of nuclear pleomorphism, which should not be misconstrued to be dysplastic. If the sections are thick, the urothelium may appear hyperchromatic and this artifact compounded with tangential sectioning may result in changes felt to represent dysplasia. Vagaries of staining and fixation may also impart hyperchromasia to benign nuclei. Normal urothelium shows reactivity for CK20 only in the superficial umbrella cell layer, while CD44 staining is limited to the basal and parabasal urothelial cells. Nuclear staining for p53 is absent in normal urothelium [4].


How much do you know about benign, preneoplastic, non-invasive and invasive neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder classified according to the 2004 WHO scheme?

Montironi R, Cheng L, Scarpelli M, Mazzucchelli R, Lopez-Beltran A - Diagn Pathol (2011)

Normal urothelium.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3107770&req=5

Figure 1: Normal urothelium.
Mentions: Urothelium (Figure 1) is a multilayered epithelium of the urinary bladder, ureters, and renal pelvis in which the cells mature to form the very large surface "umbrella cells." The thickness of the normal urothelium varies with the state of distension of the bladder (2 to 4 cell layers when dilated and 5 to 7 layers when contracted) [3]. The urothelium of the renal pelvis, urethra and the bladder neck is usually composed of slightly larger cells, which have diminished cytoplasmic clearing and hence may be misinterpreted as dysplasia. Umbrella cells may show some degree of nuclear pleomorphism, which should not be misconstrued to be dysplastic. If the sections are thick, the urothelium may appear hyperchromatic and this artifact compounded with tangential sectioning may result in changes felt to represent dysplasia. Vagaries of staining and fixation may also impart hyperchromasia to benign nuclei. Normal urothelium shows reactivity for CK20 only in the superficial umbrella cell layer, while CD44 staining is limited to the basal and parabasal urothelial cells. Nuclear staining for p53 is absent in normal urothelium [4].

Bottom Line: The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary.This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Pathological Anatomy, School of Medicine, Polytechnic University of the Marche Region (Ancona), Ancona, Italy. r.montironi@univpm.it

ABSTRACT
The aim of this essay is the self assessment of the level of knowledge of the 2004 WHO classification of bladder neoplasms through a series of MCQs, each associated a short commentary. This paper is directed to all who are involved with the application of this classification at the anticancer research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic levels, in particular to uropathologists, urologists and oncologists.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus