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Anaesthesia for the separation of conjoined twins.

Lalwani J, Dubey K, Shah P - Indian J Anaesth (2011)

Bottom Line: Thoraco-omphalopagus is one of the most common type of conjoint twins accounting for 74% cases of conjoint twins.We report the anaesthetic management for successful separation of thoraco-omphalopagus conjoint twins, both of them surviving till date.Detailed description of successful management is reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, PT.J.N.M. Medical College and Dr. Bram Hospital, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India.

ABSTRACT
Thoraco-omphalopagus is one of the most common type of conjoint twins accounting for 74% cases of conjoint twins. We report the anaesthetic management for successful separation of thoraco-omphalopagus conjoint twins, both of them surviving till date. We highlight the responsibility of anaesthesia team in anaesthetising the two individual patients simultaneously, need of careful monitoring and anticipation of complications like massive blood loss, hypotension, hypokalemia, hypoxia and hypercabia. Detailed description of successful management is reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Twins after separation
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Figure 0004: Twins after separation

Mentions: Incision was made on the skin bridge connecting both twins. Surgical steps included reduction of intestinal herniation, liver resection using harmonic scalpel and separation of diaphragms. Finally remainder of connecting bridge of abdominal wall was divided thus separating the twins [Figure 4]. Blood loss was very difficult to estimate but was done by weighing the swabs, measuring the loss into the vaccum suction bottle and by serial haematocrits.


Anaesthesia for the separation of conjoined twins.

Lalwani J, Dubey K, Shah P - Indian J Anaesth (2011)

Twins after separation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3106394&req=5

Figure 0004: Twins after separation
Mentions: Incision was made on the skin bridge connecting both twins. Surgical steps included reduction of intestinal herniation, liver resection using harmonic scalpel and separation of diaphragms. Finally remainder of connecting bridge of abdominal wall was divided thus separating the twins [Figure 4]. Blood loss was very difficult to estimate but was done by weighing the swabs, measuring the loss into the vaccum suction bottle and by serial haematocrits.

Bottom Line: Thoraco-omphalopagus is one of the most common type of conjoint twins accounting for 74% cases of conjoint twins.We report the anaesthetic management for successful separation of thoraco-omphalopagus conjoint twins, both of them surviving till date.Detailed description of successful management is reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, PT.J.N.M. Medical College and Dr. Bram Hospital, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India.

ABSTRACT
Thoraco-omphalopagus is one of the most common type of conjoint twins accounting for 74% cases of conjoint twins. We report the anaesthetic management for successful separation of thoraco-omphalopagus conjoint twins, both of them surviving till date. We highlight the responsibility of anaesthesia team in anaesthetising the two individual patients simultaneously, need of careful monitoring and anticipation of complications like massive blood loss, hypotension, hypokalemia, hypoxia and hypercabia. Detailed description of successful management is reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus