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Caudate nucleus and insular activation during a pain suppression paradigm comparing thermal and electrical stimulation.

Wunderlich AP, Klug R, Stuber G, Landwehrmeyer B, Weber F, Freund W - Open Neuroimag J (2011)

Bottom Line: It is needed to adapt to chronic stimuli.During the task to suppress the feeling of pain, there were no consistent activations stronger under thermostimulation.The caudate nucleus seems to play an important role not only in the motor system but also in the modulation of the pain experience.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Pain modulation is an integral function of the nervous system. It is needed to adapt to chronic stimuli. To gain insights into pain suppression mechanisms, two studies concerning the suppression of the feeling of pain with different stimulation modalities (heat vs. electrical stimuli) but using the same stimulation paradigms were compared: 15 subjects each had been stimulated on both hands under the instruction to suppress the feeling of pain. Anterior insula and DLPFC activation was seen in both single modality studies and seems to be a common feature of pain suppression, as it is absent in the interaction analyses presented here. During the task to suppress the feeling of pain, there were no consistent activations stronger under thermostimulation. But during electrostimulation, there was significantly stronger activation than during thermal stimulation in the caudate nucleus bilaterally and in the contralateral posterior insula. This may be attributed to the higher sensory-discriminative content and more demand on subjective rating and suppression of the painful electrical stimulus, compared to thermostimulation. The caudate nucleus seems to play an important role not only in the motor system but also in the modulation of the pain experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stimulation paradigm during the trials: Alternating phases of rest and painful stimulation. The tonic stimulation was divided into an early and late phase for purposes of analysis; the stimulation, however, was the same.
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Figure 1: Stimulation paradigm during the trials: Alternating phases of rest and painful stimulation. The tonic stimulation was divided into an early and late phase for purposes of analysis; the stimulation, however, was the same.

Mentions: The stimulation levels were chosen after another experiment with different stimulation levels. The maximally tolerated pain, however was the level for which both thermal and electrical stimulation aimed in this study. The tonic painful stimulation used stimulus duration of 52 s of maximum intensity with the task to suppress the feeling of pain. It started with a rest phase (26 s) before each stimulus phase. The whole set consisted of 6 repetitions of rest and stimulation. (see Fig. 1).


Caudate nucleus and insular activation during a pain suppression paradigm comparing thermal and electrical stimulation.

Wunderlich AP, Klug R, Stuber G, Landwehrmeyer B, Weber F, Freund W - Open Neuroimag J (2011)

Stimulation paradigm during the trials: Alternating phases of rest and painful stimulation. The tonic stimulation was divided into an early and late phase for purposes of analysis; the stimulation, however, was the same.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3106353&req=5

Figure 1: Stimulation paradigm during the trials: Alternating phases of rest and painful stimulation. The tonic stimulation was divided into an early and late phase for purposes of analysis; the stimulation, however, was the same.
Mentions: The stimulation levels were chosen after another experiment with different stimulation levels. The maximally tolerated pain, however was the level for which both thermal and electrical stimulation aimed in this study. The tonic painful stimulation used stimulus duration of 52 s of maximum intensity with the task to suppress the feeling of pain. It started with a rest phase (26 s) before each stimulus phase. The whole set consisted of 6 repetitions of rest and stimulation. (see Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: It is needed to adapt to chronic stimuli.During the task to suppress the feeling of pain, there were no consistent activations stronger under thermostimulation.The caudate nucleus seems to play an important role not only in the motor system but also in the modulation of the pain experience.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Pain modulation is an integral function of the nervous system. It is needed to adapt to chronic stimuli. To gain insights into pain suppression mechanisms, two studies concerning the suppression of the feeling of pain with different stimulation modalities (heat vs. electrical stimuli) but using the same stimulation paradigms were compared: 15 subjects each had been stimulated on both hands under the instruction to suppress the feeling of pain. Anterior insula and DLPFC activation was seen in both single modality studies and seems to be a common feature of pain suppression, as it is absent in the interaction analyses presented here. During the task to suppress the feeling of pain, there were no consistent activations stronger under thermostimulation. But during electrostimulation, there was significantly stronger activation than during thermal stimulation in the caudate nucleus bilaterally and in the contralateral posterior insula. This may be attributed to the higher sensory-discriminative content and more demand on subjective rating and suppression of the painful electrical stimulus, compared to thermostimulation. The caudate nucleus seems to play an important role not only in the motor system but also in the modulation of the pain experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus