Limits...
Socio-economic outcome after blunt orthopaedic trauma: Implications on injury prevention.

Pfeifer R, Lichte P, Zelle BA, Sittaro NA, Zilkens A, Kaneshige JR, Pape HC - Patient Saf Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: Younger patients (group I) were associated with less income losses when compared with other groups (p < 0.05).Social consequences (number of friends decreased) were predominantly stated in patients younger than 18 years old (p < 0.05).Early socio-economic support and measures of injury prevention should focus on these specific age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Aachen Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Trauma, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. romanpfeifer@aol.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several large studies have identified factors associated with long-term outcome after orthopaedic injuries. However, long-term social and economic implications have not been published so far. The aim of this investigation is to study the long-term socio-economic consequences of patients sustaining severe trauma.

Methods: Patients treated at a level one trauma center were invited for a follow-up (at least 10 years) examination. There were 637 patients who responded and were examined. Inclusion criteria included injury severity score (ISS) ≥ 16 points, presence of lower and upper extremity fractures, and age between 3 and 60 years. Exclusion criteria included the presence of amputations and paraplegia. The socio-economic outcome was evaluated in three age groups: group I (< 18 years), group II (19 - 50 years), and group III (> 50 years). The following parameters were analyzed using a standardized questionnaire: financial losses, net income losses, pension precaution losses, need for a bank loan, and the decrease in number of friends.

Results: 510 patients matched all study criteria, and breakdown of groups were as follows: 140 patients in group I, 341 patients in group II, and 29 patients in group III. Financial losses were reported in all age groups (20%-44%). Younger patients (group I) were associated with less income losses when compared with other groups (p < 0.05). Financial deterioration was more frequently reported in age group II (p < 0.05). Social consequences (number of friends decreased) were predominantly stated in patients younger than 18 years old (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Economic consequences are reported by polytraumatized patients even ten or more years after injury. Financial losses appear to be common in patients between 19 and 50 years. In contrast, social deprivation appears to be most pronounced in the younger age groups. Early socio-economic support and measures of injury prevention should focus on these specific age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of financial losses in each age group
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105957&req=5

Figure 1: Frequency of financial losses in each age group

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percentage of patients with financial losses in each age group. At the time of examination, financial losses were reported in 20% of patients in age group I (< 18 years), in 44.3% of patients in age group II (19-50 years), and 37.9% in age group III (> 50 years). Statistical significance was found between age group I and age group II (p < 0.0001). Differences between groups I and II (p = 0.06) and groups II and III (p = 0.4) did not reach statistical significance. At follow up, deterioration of net income was reported in 25.7% of the study population after their injuries. In group I, a loss of net income was less frequently reported compared with other groups (Figure 2; 8.6% vs. 32.6%, p = < 0.0001; 8.6% vs. 27.6%, p = 0.012; 32.6% vs. 27.6%; p = 0.22). In addition, 9.4% of the entire study population reported losses of pension precaution. Patients in age group II reported more frequent losses of pension precaution (Figure 3, 5.7% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.05; 5.7% vs. 0%, p = 0.9; 11.7% vs. 0%, p < 0.0001). In regard to financial debts, 1.4% of patients in age group I, 7.3% of patients in age group II, and 3.4% of patients in age group III required a bank loan after injury (Figure 4; 1.4% vs. 7.3%, p = 0.02; 1.4% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.4; 7.3% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.5).


Socio-economic outcome after blunt orthopaedic trauma: Implications on injury prevention.

Pfeifer R, Lichte P, Zelle BA, Sittaro NA, Zilkens A, Kaneshige JR, Pape HC - Patient Saf Surg (2011)

Frequency of financial losses in each age group
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105957&req=5

Figure 1: Frequency of financial losses in each age group
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percentage of patients with financial losses in each age group. At the time of examination, financial losses were reported in 20% of patients in age group I (< 18 years), in 44.3% of patients in age group II (19-50 years), and 37.9% in age group III (> 50 years). Statistical significance was found between age group I and age group II (p < 0.0001). Differences between groups I and II (p = 0.06) and groups II and III (p = 0.4) did not reach statistical significance. At follow up, deterioration of net income was reported in 25.7% of the study population after their injuries. In group I, a loss of net income was less frequently reported compared with other groups (Figure 2; 8.6% vs. 32.6%, p = < 0.0001; 8.6% vs. 27.6%, p = 0.012; 32.6% vs. 27.6%; p = 0.22). In addition, 9.4% of the entire study population reported losses of pension precaution. Patients in age group II reported more frequent losses of pension precaution (Figure 3, 5.7% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.05; 5.7% vs. 0%, p = 0.9; 11.7% vs. 0%, p < 0.0001). In regard to financial debts, 1.4% of patients in age group I, 7.3% of patients in age group II, and 3.4% of patients in age group III required a bank loan after injury (Figure 4; 1.4% vs. 7.3%, p = 0.02; 1.4% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.4; 7.3% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.5).

Bottom Line: Younger patients (group I) were associated with less income losses when compared with other groups (p < 0.05).Social consequences (number of friends decreased) were predominantly stated in patients younger than 18 years old (p < 0.05).Early socio-economic support and measures of injury prevention should focus on these specific age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Aachen Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Trauma, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. romanpfeifer@aol.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several large studies have identified factors associated with long-term outcome after orthopaedic injuries. However, long-term social and economic implications have not been published so far. The aim of this investigation is to study the long-term socio-economic consequences of patients sustaining severe trauma.

Methods: Patients treated at a level one trauma center were invited for a follow-up (at least 10 years) examination. There were 637 patients who responded and were examined. Inclusion criteria included injury severity score (ISS) ≥ 16 points, presence of lower and upper extremity fractures, and age between 3 and 60 years. Exclusion criteria included the presence of amputations and paraplegia. The socio-economic outcome was evaluated in three age groups: group I (< 18 years), group II (19 - 50 years), and group III (> 50 years). The following parameters were analyzed using a standardized questionnaire: financial losses, net income losses, pension precaution losses, need for a bank loan, and the decrease in number of friends.

Results: 510 patients matched all study criteria, and breakdown of groups were as follows: 140 patients in group I, 341 patients in group II, and 29 patients in group III. Financial losses were reported in all age groups (20%-44%). Younger patients (group I) were associated with less income losses when compared with other groups (p < 0.05). Financial deterioration was more frequently reported in age group II (p < 0.05). Social consequences (number of friends decreased) were predominantly stated in patients younger than 18 years old (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Economic consequences are reported by polytraumatized patients even ten or more years after injury. Financial losses appear to be common in patients between 19 and 50 years. In contrast, social deprivation appears to be most pronounced in the younger age groups. Early socio-economic support and measures of injury prevention should focus on these specific age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus