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Association of Trypanosoma vivax in extracellular sites with central nervous system lesions and changes in cerebrospinal fluid in experimentally infected goats.

Batista JS, Rodrigues CM, García HA, Bezerra FS, Olinda RG, Teixeira MM, Soto-Blanco B - Vet. Res. (2011)

Bottom Line: CSF analysis revealed the presence of T. vivax for G2.Meningitis and meningoencephalitis were diagnosed in G2.PCR were positive for T. vivax in all the samples tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-árido (UFERSA), BR 110 - Km 47, CEP: 59625-900, Mossoró-RN, Brazil. jaelsoares@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and anatomical and histopathological central nervous system (CNS) lesions were evaluated, and the presence of Trypanosoma vivax in CNS tissues was investigated through PCR. Twelve adult male goats were divided into three groups (G): G1, infected with T. vivax and evaluated during the acute phase; G2, infected goats evaluated during the chronic phase; and G3, consisting of non-infected goats. Each goat from G1 and G2 was infected with 1.25 × 10(5) trypomastigotes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and investigation of T. vivax was performed at the 15th day post-infection (dpi) in G1 goats and on the fifth day after the manifestation of nervous system infection signs in G2 goats. All goats were necropsied, and CNS fragments from G1 and G2 goats were evaluated by PCR for the determination of T. vivax. Hyperthermia, anemia and parasitemia were observed from the fifth dpi for G1 and G2, with the highest parasitemia peak between the seventh and 21st dpi. Nervous system infection signs were observed in three G2 goats between the 30th and 35th dpi. CSF analysis revealed the presence of T. vivax for G2. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis were diagnosed in G2. PCR were positive for T. vivax in all the samples tested. In conclusion, T. vivax may reach the nervous tissue resulting in immune response from the host, which is the cause of progressive clinical and pathological manifestations of the CNS in experimentally infected goats.

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Mononuclear perivascular inflammatory infiltrate (arrows) in the cerebellar white matter observed in goat no. 6, which was infected experimentally with T. vivax and evaluated in the chronic phase (G2). H&E, obj. 40×.
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Figure 4: Mononuclear perivascular inflammatory infiltrate (arrows) in the cerebellar white matter observed in goat no. 6, which was infected experimentally with T. vivax and evaluated in the chronic phase (G2). H&E, obj. 40×.

Mentions: In the histological exam, severe lesions were observed in the central nervous system of the goats with neurological signs. In these animals, meningitis (goat no. 5) and meningoencephalitis (goats no. 6 and 7) were observed. Meningitis was characterized by the presence of inflammatory infiltrate mainly consisting of lymphocytes and plasmocytes (Figure 3). Encephalitis was demonstrated by perivascular infiltrates composed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes and macrophages. The inflammatory perivascular infiltrates were more severe and involved a greater number of vessels in the cerebellar white matter, cerebellar peduncle and pons. In the telencephalon, at the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal cortices, in the mesencephalon and in the thalamus, the same lesions were observed, but at a lower level of severity (Figure 4). There were no lesions in the CNS of G1 or G3 animals.


Association of Trypanosoma vivax in extracellular sites with central nervous system lesions and changes in cerebrospinal fluid in experimentally infected goats.

Batista JS, Rodrigues CM, García HA, Bezerra FS, Olinda RG, Teixeira MM, Soto-Blanco B - Vet. Res. (2011)

Mononuclear perivascular inflammatory infiltrate (arrows) in the cerebellar white matter observed in goat no. 6, which was infected experimentally with T. vivax and evaluated in the chronic phase (G2). H&E, obj. 40×.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105954&req=5

Figure 4: Mononuclear perivascular inflammatory infiltrate (arrows) in the cerebellar white matter observed in goat no. 6, which was infected experimentally with T. vivax and evaluated in the chronic phase (G2). H&E, obj. 40×.
Mentions: In the histological exam, severe lesions were observed in the central nervous system of the goats with neurological signs. In these animals, meningitis (goat no. 5) and meningoencephalitis (goats no. 6 and 7) were observed. Meningitis was characterized by the presence of inflammatory infiltrate mainly consisting of lymphocytes and plasmocytes (Figure 3). Encephalitis was demonstrated by perivascular infiltrates composed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes and macrophages. The inflammatory perivascular infiltrates were more severe and involved a greater number of vessels in the cerebellar white matter, cerebellar peduncle and pons. In the telencephalon, at the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal cortices, in the mesencephalon and in the thalamus, the same lesions were observed, but at a lower level of severity (Figure 4). There were no lesions in the CNS of G1 or G3 animals.

Bottom Line: CSF analysis revealed the presence of T. vivax for G2.Meningitis and meningoencephalitis were diagnosed in G2.PCR were positive for T. vivax in all the samples tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Sciences, Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-árido (UFERSA), BR 110 - Km 47, CEP: 59625-900, Mossoró-RN, Brazil. jaelsoares@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and anatomical and histopathological central nervous system (CNS) lesions were evaluated, and the presence of Trypanosoma vivax in CNS tissues was investigated through PCR. Twelve adult male goats were divided into three groups (G): G1, infected with T. vivax and evaluated during the acute phase; G2, infected goats evaluated during the chronic phase; and G3, consisting of non-infected goats. Each goat from G1 and G2 was infected with 1.25 × 10(5) trypomastigotes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and investigation of T. vivax was performed at the 15th day post-infection (dpi) in G1 goats and on the fifth day after the manifestation of nervous system infection signs in G2 goats. All goats were necropsied, and CNS fragments from G1 and G2 goats were evaluated by PCR for the determination of T. vivax. Hyperthermia, anemia and parasitemia were observed from the fifth dpi for G1 and G2, with the highest parasitemia peak between the seventh and 21st dpi. Nervous system infection signs were observed in three G2 goats between the 30th and 35th dpi. CSF analysis revealed the presence of T. vivax for G2. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis were diagnosed in G2. PCR were positive for T. vivax in all the samples tested. In conclusion, T. vivax may reach the nervous tissue resulting in immune response from the host, which is the cause of progressive clinical and pathological manifestations of the CNS in experimentally infected goats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus