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Harnessing technology to improve formative assessment of student conceptions in STEM: forging a national network.

Haudek KC, Kaplan JJ, Knight J, Long T, Merrill J, Munn A, Nehm R, Smith M, Urban-Lurain M - CBE Life Sci Educ (2011)

Bottom Line: However, students often have complex, heterogeneous ideas about scientific concepts.Participants at the meeting shared existing work on lexical analysis and concept inventories, participated in technology demonstrations and workshops, and discussed research goals.We are seeking interested collaborators to join our research community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Science and Mathematics Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

ABSTRACT
Concept inventories, consisting of multiple-choice questions designed around common student misconceptions, are designed to reveal student thinking. However, students often have complex, heterogeneous ideas about scientific concepts. Constructed-response assessments, in which students must create their own answer, may better reveal students' thinking, but are time- and resource-intensive to evaluate. This report describes the initial meeting of a National Science Foundation-funded cross-institutional collaboration of interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education researchers interested in exploring the use of automated text analysis to evaluate constructed-response assessments. Participants at the meeting shared existing work on lexical analysis and concept inventories, participated in technology demonstrations and workshops, and discussed research goals. We are seeking interested collaborators to join our research community.

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Participants in the initial meeting of Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods. Shown in the picture (from left to right): Olga Eremina, Kevin Haudek, John Merrill, Alan Munn, Jenny Knight, Ross Nehm, Michelle Smith, Mark Urban-Lurain, Jennifer Kaplan, Julie Libarkin, Merle Heidemann, Mary Anne Sydlik, Minsu Ha, Brittany Shaffer, Tammy Long, and Casey Lyons. Not pictured: Hendrik Haertig and Shauna Jones.
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Figure 1: Participants in the initial meeting of Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods. Shown in the picture (from left to right): Olga Eremina, Kevin Haudek, John Merrill, Alan Munn, Jenny Knight, Ross Nehm, Michelle Smith, Mark Urban-Lurain, Jennifer Kaplan, Julie Libarkin, Merle Heidemann, Mary Anne Sydlik, Minsu Ha, Brittany Shaffer, Tammy Long, and Casey Lyons. Not pictured: Hendrik Haertig and Shauna Jones.

Mentions: Members of AACR recently received NSF funding for the project Collaborative Research: Automated Analysis of Constructed Response Concept Inventories to Reveal Student Thinking: Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods (NSF DUE-1022653). On November 19–20, 2010, we held the initial meeting of this project at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing. Attending the meeting were 18 participants from our 7 participating universities (Figure 1). Goals of this initial meeting included the following:


Harnessing technology to improve formative assessment of student conceptions in STEM: forging a national network.

Haudek KC, Kaplan JJ, Knight J, Long T, Merrill J, Munn A, Nehm R, Smith M, Urban-Lurain M - CBE Life Sci Educ (2011)

Participants in the initial meeting of Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods. Shown in the picture (from left to right): Olga Eremina, Kevin Haudek, John Merrill, Alan Munn, Jenny Knight, Ross Nehm, Michelle Smith, Mark Urban-Lurain, Jennifer Kaplan, Julie Libarkin, Merle Heidemann, Mary Anne Sydlik, Minsu Ha, Brittany Shaffer, Tammy Long, and Casey Lyons. Not pictured: Hendrik Haertig and Shauna Jones.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105921&req=5

Figure 1: Participants in the initial meeting of Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods. Shown in the picture (from left to right): Olga Eremina, Kevin Haudek, John Merrill, Alan Munn, Jenny Knight, Ross Nehm, Michelle Smith, Mark Urban-Lurain, Jennifer Kaplan, Julie Libarkin, Merle Heidemann, Mary Anne Sydlik, Minsu Ha, Brittany Shaffer, Tammy Long, and Casey Lyons. Not pictured: Hendrik Haertig and Shauna Jones.
Mentions: Members of AACR recently received NSF funding for the project Collaborative Research: Automated Analysis of Constructed Response Concept Inventories to Reveal Student Thinking: Forging a National Network for Innovative Assessment Methods (NSF DUE-1022653). On November 19–20, 2010, we held the initial meeting of this project at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing. Attending the meeting were 18 participants from our 7 participating universities (Figure 1). Goals of this initial meeting included the following:

Bottom Line: However, students often have complex, heterogeneous ideas about scientific concepts.Participants at the meeting shared existing work on lexical analysis and concept inventories, participated in technology demonstrations and workshops, and discussed research goals.We are seeking interested collaborators to join our research community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Science and Mathematics Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

ABSTRACT
Concept inventories, consisting of multiple-choice questions designed around common student misconceptions, are designed to reveal student thinking. However, students often have complex, heterogeneous ideas about scientific concepts. Constructed-response assessments, in which students must create their own answer, may better reveal students' thinking, but are time- and resource-intensive to evaluate. This report describes the initial meeting of a National Science Foundation-funded cross-institutional collaboration of interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education researchers interested in exploring the use of automated text analysis to evaluate constructed-response assessments. Participants at the meeting shared existing work on lexical analysis and concept inventories, participated in technology demonstrations and workshops, and discussed research goals. We are seeking interested collaborators to join our research community.

Show MeSH