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Drawing and interpreting data: Children's impressions of onchocerciasis and community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in four onchocerciasis endemic countries in Africa.

Amuyunzu-Nyamongo M, Tchounkeu YF, Oyugi RA, Kabali AT, Okeibunor JC, Manianga C, Amazigo UV - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2011)

Bottom Line: Out of the 50 drawings, 30 were on symptoms, 7 on effects of the disease on children, 8 on distribution process, and 5 represented multiple perceptions on symptoms, drug distribution processes, benefits, and effects of treatment.The lack of clarity when treatment with ivermectin can be stopped in endemic areas requires working with children to ensure continued compliance with treatment into the future.Children's drawings should be incorporated into health education interventions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: African Institute for Health and Development, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT
Although the depiction of a child leading a blind man is the most enduring image of onchocerciasis in Africa, research activities have hardly involved children. This paper aims at giving voice to children through drawings and their interpretation. The study was conducted in 2009 in Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria and Uganda. Children aged 6-16 years were asked to draw their perceptions of onchocerciasis and community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in their communities. A total of 50 drawings were generated. The drawings depicted four main aspects of onchocerciasis: (1) the disease symptoms, (2) the negative consequences of onchocerciasis among children and in the community generally, (3) the ivermectin distribution process, and (4) the benefits or effects of taking ivermectin. Out of the 50 drawings, 30 were on symptoms, 7 on effects of the disease on children, 8 on distribution process, and 5 represented multiple perceptions on symptoms, drug distribution processes, benefits, and effects of treatment. The lack of clarity when treatment with ivermectin can be stopped in endemic areas requires working with children to ensure continued compliance with treatment into the future. Children's drawings should be incorporated into health education interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Children with skin problems
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Figure 0002: Children with skin problems

Mentions: The most common signs of onchocerciasis identified by the children were rashes all over the body (some could even be seen through clothing), nodules, and blindness. As shown in Figure 1 above, the patient had rashes all over the body while Figure 2 depicts children who have scabies and seem to be experiencing some discomfort. Both figures, drawn by children in DRC, illustrate that the children are aware of the signs and symptoms of onchocerciasis as defined in their communities.


Drawing and interpreting data: Children's impressions of onchocerciasis and community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in four onchocerciasis endemic countries in Africa.

Amuyunzu-Nyamongo M, Tchounkeu YF, Oyugi RA, Kabali AT, Okeibunor JC, Manianga C, Amazigo UV - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2011)

Children with skin problems
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105904&req=5

Figure 0002: Children with skin problems
Mentions: The most common signs of onchocerciasis identified by the children were rashes all over the body (some could even be seen through clothing), nodules, and blindness. As shown in Figure 1 above, the patient had rashes all over the body while Figure 2 depicts children who have scabies and seem to be experiencing some discomfort. Both figures, drawn by children in DRC, illustrate that the children are aware of the signs and symptoms of onchocerciasis as defined in their communities.

Bottom Line: Out of the 50 drawings, 30 were on symptoms, 7 on effects of the disease on children, 8 on distribution process, and 5 represented multiple perceptions on symptoms, drug distribution processes, benefits, and effects of treatment.The lack of clarity when treatment with ivermectin can be stopped in endemic areas requires working with children to ensure continued compliance with treatment into the future.Children's drawings should be incorporated into health education interventions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: African Institute for Health and Development, Nairobi, Kenya.

ABSTRACT
Although the depiction of a child leading a blind man is the most enduring image of onchocerciasis in Africa, research activities have hardly involved children. This paper aims at giving voice to children through drawings and their interpretation. The study was conducted in 2009 in Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria and Uganda. Children aged 6-16 years were asked to draw their perceptions of onchocerciasis and community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) in their communities. A total of 50 drawings were generated. The drawings depicted four main aspects of onchocerciasis: (1) the disease symptoms, (2) the negative consequences of onchocerciasis among children and in the community generally, (3) the ivermectin distribution process, and (4) the benefits or effects of taking ivermectin. Out of the 50 drawings, 30 were on symptoms, 7 on effects of the disease on children, 8 on distribution process, and 5 represented multiple perceptions on symptoms, drug distribution processes, benefits, and effects of treatment. The lack of clarity when treatment with ivermectin can be stopped in endemic areas requires working with children to ensure continued compliance with treatment into the future. Children's drawings should be incorporated into health education interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus