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Development of a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction with allergen-specific immunotherapy in adults: item generation, item reduction, and preliminary validation.

Justícia JL, Baró E, Cardona V, Guardia P, Ojeda P, Olaguíbel JM, Vega JM, Vidal C - Patient Prefer Adherence (2011)

Bottom Line: Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score.Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms.This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Stallergenes Ibérica, Barcelona, Spain;

ABSTRACT

Background: Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a treatment capable of modifying the natural course of allergy, so ensuring good adherence to SIT is fundamental. Up until now there has not existed an instrument specifically developed to measure patient satisfaction with SIT, although its assessment could help us to comprehend better and improve treatment adherence and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adult patient satisfaction with SIT.

Methods: Items were generated from a literature review, focus groups with allergic adult patients undergoing SIT, and a meeting with experts. Potential items were administered to allergic patients undergoing SIT in an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Item reduction was based on quantitative and qualitative criteria. A preliminary assessment of feasibility, reliability, and validity of the retained items was performed.

Results: An initial pool of 70 items was administered to 257 patients undergoing SIT. Fifty-four items were eliminated resulting in a provisional instrument with 16 items. Factor analysis yielded four factors that were identified as perceived efficacy, activities and environment, cost-benefit balance, and overall satisfaction, explaining 74.8% of variance. Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score. Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms.

Conclusion: This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity.

No MeSH data available.


Items eliminated at different stages of the item reduction process.
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f2-ppa-5-239: Items eliminated at different stages of the item reduction process.

Mentions: Fifty-four of the initial 70 items included in the item reduction phase were eliminated. The reasons for their elimination and the number of items eliminated for each reason are shown in Figure 2. With respect to the quantitative criteria applied for the process of item reduction, three of them, ie, poor response distribution, impact score and ranking (see summary in Table 2), and internal consistency parameters (item-total correlation and contribution to Cronbach’s alpha) were found to be the most efficient, and responsible for eliminating 47 of the initial items. Six items were eliminated due to qualitative criteria, leaving a prevalidated version containing 16 items, the length of which would presumably be more apt for use in clinical practice. The decision regarding the elimination of each of the six items was widely discussed and taken by general consent by the group of investigators based on the face validity of the item, its redundancy, and the length or complexity of wording.


Development of a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction with allergen-specific immunotherapy in adults: item generation, item reduction, and preliminary validation.

Justícia JL, Baró E, Cardona V, Guardia P, Ojeda P, Olaguíbel JM, Vega JM, Vidal C - Patient Prefer Adherence (2011)

Items eliminated at different stages of the item reduction process.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105877&req=5

f2-ppa-5-239: Items eliminated at different stages of the item reduction process.
Mentions: Fifty-four of the initial 70 items included in the item reduction phase were eliminated. The reasons for their elimination and the number of items eliminated for each reason are shown in Figure 2. With respect to the quantitative criteria applied for the process of item reduction, three of them, ie, poor response distribution, impact score and ranking (see summary in Table 2), and internal consistency parameters (item-total correlation and contribution to Cronbach’s alpha) were found to be the most efficient, and responsible for eliminating 47 of the initial items. Six items were eliminated due to qualitative criteria, leaving a prevalidated version containing 16 items, the length of which would presumably be more apt for use in clinical practice. The decision regarding the elimination of each of the six items was widely discussed and taken by general consent by the group of investigators based on the face validity of the item, its redundancy, and the length or complexity of wording.

Bottom Line: Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score.Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms.This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Stallergenes Ibérica, Barcelona, Spain;

ABSTRACT

Background: Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a treatment capable of modifying the natural course of allergy, so ensuring good adherence to SIT is fundamental. Up until now there has not existed an instrument specifically developed to measure patient satisfaction with SIT, although its assessment could help us to comprehend better and improve treatment adherence and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adult patient satisfaction with SIT.

Methods: Items were generated from a literature review, focus groups with allergic adult patients undergoing SIT, and a meeting with experts. Potential items were administered to allergic patients undergoing SIT in an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Item reduction was based on quantitative and qualitative criteria. A preliminary assessment of feasibility, reliability, and validity of the retained items was performed.

Results: An initial pool of 70 items was administered to 257 patients undergoing SIT. Fifty-four items were eliminated resulting in a provisional instrument with 16 items. Factor analysis yielded four factors that were identified as perceived efficacy, activities and environment, cost-benefit balance, and overall satisfaction, explaining 74.8% of variance. Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score. Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms.

Conclusion: This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity.

No MeSH data available.