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Patient information in otorhinolaryngology: a prospective audit.

Henney S, Rakhra S - JRSM Short Rep (2011)

Bottom Line: Following a departmental drive towards provision of patient information, 64% of patients received written patient information improving the rate of recall of the majority of complications from 24% to 52%.There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction between groups.Written patient information leaflets are a useful tool to improve recall of information given to patients, in order to facilitate informed consent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT Department, University Hospital of North Staffordshire , Stoke-on-Trent , UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of patient information is to involve patients in their condition and their treatment. The literature states that good information can improve medical outcomes, reduce patient anxiety and that patients want access to it. We wanted to calculate the provision of written patient information to ENT day-case patients, measure information recall and patient satisfaction.

Design: A prospective audit cycle. The first cycle of the audit studied patients receiving current practice, where verbal information was provided but written patient information was not routine. Following a departmental drive towards provision of written patient information, a second cycle was audited. A questionnaire on admission to the ward on the day of surgery was used to measure outcomes.

Setting: The ENT Department of a UK university teaching hospital.

Main outcome measures: The number of patients receiving written patient information, the rate of recall of complications and patient satisfaction with the information provided.

Participants: One hundred patients undergoing day-case surgery were included. The first cycle of the audit studied 50 consecutive patients, receiving current practice. The second cycle, following implementation of change, studied a further 50 consecutive patients.

Results: Following a departmental drive towards provision of patient information, 64% of patients received written patient information improving the rate of recall of the majority of complications from 24% to 52%. There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction between groups.

Conclusions: Written patient information leaflets are a useful tool to improve recall of information given to patients, in order to facilitate informed consent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall satisfaction with information received
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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SHORTS-11-022F3: Overall satisfaction with information received

Mentions: FigureĀ 3 indicates a trend towards greater patient satisfaction in cycle 2 with more patients in the excellent group, 34%, compared to 16% in cycle 1, however, this is not statistically significant.


Patient information in otorhinolaryngology: a prospective audit.

Henney S, Rakhra S - JRSM Short Rep (2011)

Overall satisfaction with information received
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105459&req=5

SHORTS-11-022F3: Overall satisfaction with information received
Mentions: FigureĀ 3 indicates a trend towards greater patient satisfaction in cycle 2 with more patients in the excellent group, 34%, compared to 16% in cycle 1, however, this is not statistically significant.

Bottom Line: Following a departmental drive towards provision of patient information, 64% of patients received written patient information improving the rate of recall of the majority of complications from 24% to 52%.There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction between groups.Written patient information leaflets are a useful tool to improve recall of information given to patients, in order to facilitate informed consent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT Department, University Hospital of North Staffordshire , Stoke-on-Trent , UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of patient information is to involve patients in their condition and their treatment. The literature states that good information can improve medical outcomes, reduce patient anxiety and that patients want access to it. We wanted to calculate the provision of written patient information to ENT day-case patients, measure information recall and patient satisfaction.

Design: A prospective audit cycle. The first cycle of the audit studied patients receiving current practice, where verbal information was provided but written patient information was not routine. Following a departmental drive towards provision of written patient information, a second cycle was audited. A questionnaire on admission to the ward on the day of surgery was used to measure outcomes.

Setting: The ENT Department of a UK university teaching hospital.

Main outcome measures: The number of patients receiving written patient information, the rate of recall of complications and patient satisfaction with the information provided.

Participants: One hundred patients undergoing day-case surgery were included. The first cycle of the audit studied 50 consecutive patients, receiving current practice. The second cycle, following implementation of change, studied a further 50 consecutive patients.

Results: Following a departmental drive towards provision of patient information, 64% of patients received written patient information improving the rate of recall of the majority of complications from 24% to 52%. There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction between groups.

Conclusions: Written patient information leaflets are a useful tool to improve recall of information given to patients, in order to facilitate informed consent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus