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High efficiency coherent optical memory with warm rubidium vapour.

Hosseini M, Sparkes BM, Campbell G, Lam PK, Buchler BC - Nat Commun (2011)

Bottom Line: Here, we present results from a coherent optical memory based on warm rubidium vapour and show 87% efficient recall of light pulses, the highest efficiency measured to date for any coherent optical memory suitable for quantum information applications.We also show storage and recall of up to 20 pulses from our system.These results show that simple warm atomic vapour systems have clear potential as a platform for quantum memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.

ABSTRACT
By harnessing aspects of quantum mechanics, communication and information processing could be radically transformed. Promising forms of quantum information technology include optical quantum cryptographic systems and computing using photons for quantum logic operations. As with current information processing systems, some form of memory will be required. Quantum repeaters, which are required for long distance quantum key distribution, require quantum optical memory as do deterministic logic gates for optical quantum computing. Here, we present results from a coherent optical memory based on warm rubidium vapour and show 87% efficient recall of light pulses, the highest efficiency measured to date for any coherent optical memory suitable for quantum information applications. We also show storage and recall of up to 20 pulses from our system. These results show that simple warm atomic vapour systems have clear potential as a platform for quantum memory.

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Raman absorption line and input-echo pulses.(a) (i) The Raman absorption line before broadening. (ii) The Raman absorption line after application of the magnetic field gradient. This was observed with a single frequency continuous wave signal beam, whereas the frequency of the control beam was scanned. (b) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 2 μs. (c) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 3 μs and the control field is turned off during the storage time to reduce the decay rate of the storage. For both b and c the far off-resonant transmitted input pulse, which is used to normalize our recall efficiency, is shown in black. The control field power was 370 mW.
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f2: Raman absorption line and input-echo pulses.(a) (i) The Raman absorption line before broadening. (ii) The Raman absorption line after application of the magnetic field gradient. This was observed with a single frequency continuous wave signal beam, whereas the frequency of the control beam was scanned. (b) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 2 μs. (c) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 3 μs and the control field is turned off during the storage time to reduce the decay rate of the storage. For both b and c the far off-resonant transmitted input pulse, which is used to normalize our recall efficiency, is shown in black. The control field power was 370 mW.

Mentions: Figure 2a shows the Raman absorption line as a function of two-photon detuning (detuning from the Raman resonance) (i) with and (ii) without the applied magnetic field gradient. The absorption is sensitive to alignment, which was optimized for for the broadened feature. With the applied broadening the absorption is ~99%. This limits the maximum possible recall efficiency of our memory23 to 0.992=98%.


High efficiency coherent optical memory with warm rubidium vapour.

Hosseini M, Sparkes BM, Campbell G, Lam PK, Buchler BC - Nat Commun (2011)

Raman absorption line and input-echo pulses.(a) (i) The Raman absorption line before broadening. (ii) The Raman absorption line after application of the magnetic field gradient. This was observed with a single frequency continuous wave signal beam, whereas the frequency of the control beam was scanned. (b) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 2 μs. (c) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 3 μs and the control field is turned off during the storage time to reduce the decay rate of the storage. For both b and c the far off-resonant transmitted input pulse, which is used to normalize our recall efficiency, is shown in black. The control field power was 370 mW.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105315&req=5

f2: Raman absorption line and input-echo pulses.(a) (i) The Raman absorption line before broadening. (ii) The Raman absorption line after application of the magnetic field gradient. This was observed with a single frequency continuous wave signal beam, whereas the frequency of the control beam was scanned. (b) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 2 μs. (c) Storage and recall data with an input pulse duration of 3 μs and the control field is turned off during the storage time to reduce the decay rate of the storage. For both b and c the far off-resonant transmitted input pulse, which is used to normalize our recall efficiency, is shown in black. The control field power was 370 mW.
Mentions: Figure 2a shows the Raman absorption line as a function of two-photon detuning (detuning from the Raman resonance) (i) with and (ii) without the applied magnetic field gradient. The absorption is sensitive to alignment, which was optimized for for the broadened feature. With the applied broadening the absorption is ~99%. This limits the maximum possible recall efficiency of our memory23 to 0.992=98%.

Bottom Line: Here, we present results from a coherent optical memory based on warm rubidium vapour and show 87% efficient recall of light pulses, the highest efficiency measured to date for any coherent optical memory suitable for quantum information applications.We also show storage and recall of up to 20 pulses from our system.These results show that simple warm atomic vapour systems have clear potential as a platform for quantum memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.

ABSTRACT
By harnessing aspects of quantum mechanics, communication and information processing could be radically transformed. Promising forms of quantum information technology include optical quantum cryptographic systems and computing using photons for quantum logic operations. As with current information processing systems, some form of memory will be required. Quantum repeaters, which are required for long distance quantum key distribution, require quantum optical memory as do deterministic logic gates for optical quantum computing. Here, we present results from a coherent optical memory based on warm rubidium vapour and show 87% efficient recall of light pulses, the highest efficiency measured to date for any coherent optical memory suitable for quantum information applications. We also show storage and recall of up to 20 pulses from our system. These results show that simple warm atomic vapour systems have clear potential as a platform for quantum memory.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus