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An overview of NMR-based metabolomics to identify secondary plant compounds involved in host plant resistance.

Leiss KA, Choi YH, Verpoorte R, Klinkhamer PG - Phytochem Rev (2010)

Bottom Line: It has been NMR which has been applied as a proof of principle to show that metabolomics can constitute a major advancement in the study of host plant resistance.Here we give an overview on the application of NMR to identify candidate compounds for host plant resistance.We focus on host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) which has been used as a model for different plant species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section Plant Ecology and Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Sylviusweg 72, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Secondary metabolites provide a potential source for the generation of host plant resistance and development of biopesticides. This is especially important in view of the rapid and vast spread of agricultural and horticultural pests worldwide. Multiple pests control tactics in the framework of an integrated pest management (IPM) programme are necessary. One important strategy of IPM is the use of chemical host plant resistance. Up to now the study of chemical host plant resistance has, for technical reasons, been restricted to the identification of single compounds applying specific chemical analyses adapted to the compound in question. In biological processes however, usually more than one compound is involved. Metabolomics allows the simultaneous detection of a wide range of compounds, providing an immediate image of the metabolome of a plant. One of the most universally used metabolomic approaches comprises nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). It has been NMR which has been applied as a proof of principle to show that metabolomics can constitute a major advancement in the study of host plant resistance. Here we give an overview on the application of NMR to identify candidate compounds for host plant resistance. We focus on host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) which has been used as a model for different plant species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Eco-metabolomic approach to study host plant resistance in western flower thrips. 1For multivariate data analysis principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied. For two dimensional NMR 2correlated spectroscopy, 3heteronuclear single quantum coherence, 4total correlated spectroscopy-heteronuclear single quantum coherence and 5heteronuclear multiple bond correlation were used
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Fig1: Eco-metabolomic approach to study host plant resistance in western flower thrips. 1For multivariate data analysis principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied. For two dimensional NMR 2correlated spectroscopy, 3heteronuclear single quantum coherence, 4total correlated spectroscopy-heteronuclear single quantum coherence and 5heteronuclear multiple bond correlation were used

Mentions: Leiss et al. (2009a, b) developed an eco-metabolomic approach (Fig. 1), based on NMR to identify candidate compounds for constitutive host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). As a proof of principle this approach was applied to three different host systems, including Senecio as a wild plant (Leiss et al. 2009a), chrysanthemum as an ornamental (Leiss et al. 2009b) and tomato as a crop (Mirnezhad et al. 2009). Firstly, thrips-resistant and -susceptible plants were identified applying in vivo thrips bioassays. The most resistant and the most susceptible plants were then chosen for NMR metabolomics. One and two-dimensional NMR was performed and the resulting metabolomic profiles of the thrips-resistant and susceptible plants were analysed with multivariate statistics like principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to identify the metabolites involved in thrips resistance. For cross reference of resistance the metabolites in question were then, if possible, confirmed by a thrips in vitro bioassay. In all three host systems used the metabolomic profiles of thrips-resistant and susceptible plants were significantly different (Fig. 2) leading to a range of different metabolites involved in thrips resistance (Table 1).Fig. 1


An overview of NMR-based metabolomics to identify secondary plant compounds involved in host plant resistance.

Leiss KA, Choi YH, Verpoorte R, Klinkhamer PG - Phytochem Rev (2010)

Eco-metabolomic approach to study host plant resistance in western flower thrips. 1For multivariate data analysis principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied. For two dimensional NMR 2correlated spectroscopy, 3heteronuclear single quantum coherence, 4total correlated spectroscopy-heteronuclear single quantum coherence and 5heteronuclear multiple bond correlation were used
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3105236&req=5

Fig1: Eco-metabolomic approach to study host plant resistance in western flower thrips. 1For multivariate data analysis principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied. For two dimensional NMR 2correlated spectroscopy, 3heteronuclear single quantum coherence, 4total correlated spectroscopy-heteronuclear single quantum coherence and 5heteronuclear multiple bond correlation were used
Mentions: Leiss et al. (2009a, b) developed an eco-metabolomic approach (Fig. 1), based on NMR to identify candidate compounds for constitutive host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). As a proof of principle this approach was applied to three different host systems, including Senecio as a wild plant (Leiss et al. 2009a), chrysanthemum as an ornamental (Leiss et al. 2009b) and tomato as a crop (Mirnezhad et al. 2009). Firstly, thrips-resistant and -susceptible plants were identified applying in vivo thrips bioassays. The most resistant and the most susceptible plants were then chosen for NMR metabolomics. One and two-dimensional NMR was performed and the resulting metabolomic profiles of the thrips-resistant and susceptible plants were analysed with multivariate statistics like principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to identify the metabolites involved in thrips resistance. For cross reference of resistance the metabolites in question were then, if possible, confirmed by a thrips in vitro bioassay. In all three host systems used the metabolomic profiles of thrips-resistant and susceptible plants were significantly different (Fig. 2) leading to a range of different metabolites involved in thrips resistance (Table 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: It has been NMR which has been applied as a proof of principle to show that metabolomics can constitute a major advancement in the study of host plant resistance.Here we give an overview on the application of NMR to identify candidate compounds for host plant resistance.We focus on host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) which has been used as a model for different plant species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section Plant Ecology and Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Sylviusweg 72, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Secondary metabolites provide a potential source for the generation of host plant resistance and development of biopesticides. This is especially important in view of the rapid and vast spread of agricultural and horticultural pests worldwide. Multiple pests control tactics in the framework of an integrated pest management (IPM) programme are necessary. One important strategy of IPM is the use of chemical host plant resistance. Up to now the study of chemical host plant resistance has, for technical reasons, been restricted to the identification of single compounds applying specific chemical analyses adapted to the compound in question. In biological processes however, usually more than one compound is involved. Metabolomics allows the simultaneous detection of a wide range of compounds, providing an immediate image of the metabolome of a plant. One of the most universally used metabolomic approaches comprises nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). It has been NMR which has been applied as a proof of principle to show that metabolomics can constitute a major advancement in the study of host plant resistance. Here we give an overview on the application of NMR to identify candidate compounds for host plant resistance. We focus on host plant resistance to western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) which has been used as a model for different plant species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus